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dc.contributor.authorAsghar, Shaheen
dc.contributor.authorMagnusson, Andres
dc.contributor.authorKhan, Azad
dc.contributor.authorAli, Keramat
dc.contributor.authorHussain, Akhtar
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-15T13:13:50Z
dc.date.available2010-11-15T13:13:50Z
dc.date.issued2010-06
dc.date.submitted2010-11-15
dc.identifier.citationObesity (Silver Spring). 2010, 18(6):1143-5en
dc.identifier.issn1930-7381
dc.identifier.pmid19798062
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/oby.2009.332
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/115586
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to examine whether the association between overweight and depression usually found in western societies would also be found in locations where overweight is not stigmatized. A total of 1,271 individuals from rural Bangladesh were randomly selected; the response rate was 76%. Depressive symptoms were measured with the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). The sum MADRS scores were 13.4 (s.d. = 5.8) and 18.5 (8.1) for overweight vs. nonoverweight (t = 6.6; P < 0.000) men, respectively, and 19.7 (7.8) and 23.2 (7.9) for overweight vs. nonoverweight women, respectively (t = 4.2; P < 0.000). Thus the MADRS score was lower in overweight individuals. After adjusting for sex and age, BMI significantly predicted the MADRS score (beta = -0.3; t = 10.2; P < 0.000). These findings suggest that overweight may be related to fewer depressive symptoms in non western cultures.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNAASO, the Obesity Societyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1038/oby.2009.332en
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshBangladeshen
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen
dc.subject.meshDepressionen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIdeal Body Weighten
dc.subject.meshLongitudinal Studiesen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshOverweighten
dc.subject.meshPsychiatric Status Rating Scalesen
dc.subject.meshRural Populationen
dc.subject.meshSeverity of Illness Indexen
dc.subject.meshSocial Classen
dc.subject.meshThinnessen
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten
dc.titleIn Bangladesh, overweight individuals have fewer symptoms of depression than nonoverweight individualsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute of Psychiatry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.en
dc.identifier.journalObesity (Silver Spring, Md.)en
html.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to examine whether the association between overweight and depression usually found in western societies would also be found in locations where overweight is not stigmatized. A total of 1,271 individuals from rural Bangladesh were randomly selected; the response rate was 76%. Depressive symptoms were measured with the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). The sum MADRS scores were 13.4 (s.d. = 5.8) and 18.5 (8.1) for overweight vs. nonoverweight (t = 6.6; P < 0.000) men, respectively, and 19.7 (7.8) and 23.2 (7.9) for overweight vs. nonoverweight women, respectively (t = 4.2; P < 0.000). Thus the MADRS score was lower in overweight individuals. After adjusting for sex and age, BMI significantly predicted the MADRS score (beta = -0.3; t = 10.2; P < 0.000). These findings suggest that overweight may be related to fewer depressive symptoms in non western cultures.


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