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dc.contributor.authorSnorrason, Ivar
dc.contributor.authorSmari, Jakob
dc.contributor.authorOlafsson, Ragnar P
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-17T15:15:39Z
dc.date.available2010-11-17T15:15:39Z
dc.date.issued2010-09
dc.date.submitted2010-11-17
dc.identifier.citationJ Behav Ther Exp Psychiatry. 2010, 41(3):238-45en
dc.identifier.issn1873-7943
dc.identifier.pmid20172501
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jbtep.2010.01.009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/115730
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractPathological skin picking (PSP) is characterized by excessive picking of the skin, resulting in significant distress or functional impairment. The aim of the present study was to investigate the emotion regulation hypothesis of PSP. University students with PSP (n = 55) and without history of PSP (n = 55) were asked to retrospectively rate the intensity of affective states before, during, and after skin picking episodes. The results showed that for a majority of the PSP sufferers, intensity of certain negative affective states (i.e. anxiety, tension or boredom) was pronounced just before picking, and diminished significantly in the period from before to after picking. Relief and gratification increased during picking whereas guilt increased afterwards. A similar pattern emerged in the control group, although a much lower level of intensity was reported. Participants were also asked to fill out questionnaires concerning emotion regulation difficulties, emotion reactivity, depression, anxiety and worry. Hierarchical logistic regressions demonstrated that emotion regulation difficulties as well as emotion reactivity predicted PSP diagnosis after depression, anxiety and worry were controlled for. Furthermore, emotion regulation difficulties statistically mediated the relationship between emotion reactivity and PSP. Overall, the findings support an emotion regulation model of PSP.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbtep.2010.01.009en
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAffective Symptomsen
dc.subject.meshEmotionsen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshImpulse Control Disordersen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshModels, Psychologicalen
dc.subject.meshSelf-Injurious Behavioren
dc.subject.meshSkinen
dc.titleEmotion regulation in pathological skin picking: findings from a non-treatment seeking sampleen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Iceland, Department of Psychology, Sturlugata, 101 Reykjavík, Iceland. ivarsnorrason@gmail.comen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of behavior therapy and experimental psychiatryen
html.description.abstractPathological skin picking (PSP) is characterized by excessive picking of the skin, resulting in significant distress or functional impairment. The aim of the present study was to investigate the emotion regulation hypothesis of PSP. University students with PSP (n = 55) and without history of PSP (n = 55) were asked to retrospectively rate the intensity of affective states before, during, and after skin picking episodes. The results showed that for a majority of the PSP sufferers, intensity of certain negative affective states (i.e. anxiety, tension or boredom) was pronounced just before picking, and diminished significantly in the period from before to after picking. Relief and gratification increased during picking whereas guilt increased afterwards. A similar pattern emerged in the control group, although a much lower level of intensity was reported. Participants were also asked to fill out questionnaires concerning emotion regulation difficulties, emotion reactivity, depression, anxiety and worry. Hierarchical logistic regressions demonstrated that emotion regulation difficulties as well as emotion reactivity predicted PSP diagnosis after depression, anxiety and worry were controlled for. Furthermore, emotion regulation difficulties statistically mediated the relationship between emotion reactivity and PSP. Overall, the findings support an emotion regulation model of PSP.


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