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dc.contributor.authorKristinsson, V H
dc.contributor.authorKristinsson, J R
dc.contributor.authorJonmundsson, G K
dc.contributor.authorJonsson, O G
dc.contributor.authorThorsson, A V
dc.contributor.authorHaraldsson, A
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-18T14:02:03Z
dc.date.available2010-11-18T14:02:03Z
dc.date.issued2001-04
dc.date.submitted2010-11-17
dc.identifier.citationPediatr Hematol Oncol. 2001, 18(3):167-72en
dc.identifier.issn0888-0018
dc.identifier.pmid11293283
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/08880010151114741
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/115822
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractWith greatly increased survival rates after childhood leukemia during the last 3 decades, the long-term effects of the treatment have become more evident. The disease and its treatment impair the immune system, but the duration of this impairment is unknown. The authors studied the serum concentrations of immunoglobulins and IgG subclasses in 20 Icelandic children cured of leukemia on average 8 years and 3 months after their treatment ended. Although no marked deviations were found in the concentrations of the main immunoglobulin classes IgA, IgM, IgG, and IgE, the IgG subclass levels were below reference values. The patients had on average 0.9 of age standardized reference values of IgG1, 0.5 of IgG2, 0.8 of IgG3, and 0.7 of IgG4. However, none had any autoimmune diseases or a markedly increased tendency for infections. The results indicate that although the immunoglobulin classes regain their normal values within a few years after cessation of treatment, recovery of the IgG subclasses, especially IgG2, is impaired.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInforma Healthcareen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08880010151114741en
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAge of Onseten
dc.subject.meshBone Marrow Transplantationen
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshImmunoglobulin Aen
dc.subject.meshImmunoglobulin Een
dc.subject.meshImmunoglobulin Gen
dc.subject.meshImmunoglobulin Men
dc.subject.meshImmunoglobulinsen
dc.subject.meshLeukemiaen
dc.subject.meshLeukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positiveen
dc.subject.meshLeukemia, Myeloid, Acuteen
dc.subject.meshPrecursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphomaen
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen
dc.subject.meshWhole-Body Irradiationen
dc.titleImmunoglobulin class and subclass concentrations after treatment of childhood leukemiaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland.en
dc.identifier.journalPediatric hematology and oncologyen
html.description.abstractWith greatly increased survival rates after childhood leukemia during the last 3 decades, the long-term effects of the treatment have become more evident. The disease and its treatment impair the immune system, but the duration of this impairment is unknown. The authors studied the serum concentrations of immunoglobulins and IgG subclasses in 20 Icelandic children cured of leukemia on average 8 years and 3 months after their treatment ended. Although no marked deviations were found in the concentrations of the main immunoglobulin classes IgA, IgM, IgG, and IgE, the IgG subclass levels were below reference values. The patients had on average 0.9 of age standardized reference values of IgG1, 0.5 of IgG2, 0.8 of IgG3, and 0.7 of IgG4. However, none had any autoimmune diseases or a markedly increased tendency for infections. The results indicate that although the immunoglobulin classes regain their normal values within a few years after cessation of treatment, recovery of the IgG subclasses, especially IgG2, is impaired.


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