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dc.contributor.authorFreysdottir, J
dc.contributor.authorOrmarsdottir, S
dc.contributor.authorSigfusson, A
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-19T13:28:39Z
dc.date.available2011-01-19T13:28:39Z
dc.date.issued1993-11-01
dc.date.submitted2011-01-19
dc.identifier.citationClin. Exp. Immunol. 1993, 94(2):286-90en
dc.identifier.issn0009-9104
dc.identifier.pmid8222319
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/119845
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractThe usefulness of several different methods for detecting immune complex formation and complement activation in the circulation were applied to samples from patients receiving intravenous Streptokinase therapy for myocardial infarction. Streptokinase is a foreign antigen and can cause immune reactions. We collected samples from 13 patients, before Streptokinase administration (baseline), at the end of infusion (1 h), 12 h later and on day 7. We measured IgG containing immune complexes (IgG-IC), free C3d and antibodies to Streptokinase by ELISA, and CR1, C3d and C4d on erythrocytes by flow cytometric assay. Antibodies to Streptokinase are common, as all but two of the patients had measurable antibody levels. During Streptokinase treatment there was a drop in antibody levels, most prominent in those patients who had high baseline levels. At the same time increased levels of free C3d and erythrocyte-bound C3d were observed. After 12 h free C3d was usually back to baseline level, but C3d on erythrocytes was still raised. These data indicate the formation of Streptokinase immune complexes in patients with high Streptokinase antibody levels, and show that these complexes are cleared rapidly from the circulation, leaving more persistent signs of complement activation. We conclude that free C3d is a good indicator of ongoing complement activation, whereas C3d on erythrocytes indicates that complement activation has recently taken place.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBlackwell Scientific Publicationsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/ppmc/articles/PMC1534224/en
dc.subject.meshAntibodiesen
dc.subject.meshAntigen-Antibody Complexen
dc.subject.meshComplement Activationen
dc.subject.meshComplement C3en
dc.subject.meshComplement C3den
dc.subject.meshComplement C4en
dc.subject.meshComplement C4ben
dc.subject.meshErythrocytesen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshInfusions, Intravenousen
dc.subject.meshMyocardial Infarctionen
dc.subject.meshPeptide Fragmentsen
dc.subject.meshReceptors, Complement 3ben
dc.subject.meshStreptokinaseen
dc.titleEvaluation of in vivo immune complex formation and complement activation in patients receiving intravenous streptokinaseen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Immunology, National University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.en
dc.identifier.journalClinical and experimental immunologyen
html.description.abstractThe usefulness of several different methods for detecting immune complex formation and complement activation in the circulation were applied to samples from patients receiving intravenous Streptokinase therapy for myocardial infarction. Streptokinase is a foreign antigen and can cause immune reactions. We collected samples from 13 patients, before Streptokinase administration (baseline), at the end of infusion (1 h), 12 h later and on day 7. We measured IgG containing immune complexes (IgG-IC), free C3d and antibodies to Streptokinase by ELISA, and CR1, C3d and C4d on erythrocytes by flow cytometric assay. Antibodies to Streptokinase are common, as all but two of the patients had measurable antibody levels. During Streptokinase treatment there was a drop in antibody levels, most prominent in those patients who had high baseline levels. At the same time increased levels of free C3d and erythrocyte-bound C3d were observed. After 12 h free C3d was usually back to baseline level, but C3d on erythrocytes was still raised. These data indicate the formation of Streptokinase immune complexes in patients with high Streptokinase antibody levels, and show that these complexes are cleared rapidly from the circulation, leaving more persistent signs of complement activation. We conclude that free C3d is a good indicator of ongoing complement activation, whereas C3d on erythrocytes indicates that complement activation has recently taken place.


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