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dc.contributor.authorLudviksson, B R
dc.contributor.authorEiriksson, T H
dc.contributor.authorArdal, B
dc.contributor.authorSigfusson, A
dc.contributor.authorValdimarsson, H
dc.date.accessioned2011-02-14T11:41:32Z
dc.date.available2011-02-14T11:41:32Z
dc.date.issued1992-07
dc.date.submitted2011-02-14
dc.identifier.citationJ Pediatr. 1992, 121(1):23-7en
dc.identifier.pmid1625088
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0022-3476(05)82535-1
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/121821
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractWe studied the relationship of serum levels of IgA and IgE to allergic manifestations and otitis media in a cohort of 179 Icelandic children, aged 18 to 23 months. Only one of the infants had IgA deficiency (less than 50 micrograms/ml); all the others had IgA levels that were normal for their age. The children were divided into three groups according to their IgA levels (lowest 25%, intermediate 50%, highest 25%) and the clinical findings analyzed accordingly. The cumulative incidence of definite allergic manifestations was 37%. Asthma and otitis media were significantly more common among the infants with low normal IgA levels than among those with intermediate to high IgA levels. There was also a significant association between the severity of allergic manifestations and low IgA levels (p = 0.002). Children with detectable IgE (greater than or equal to 0.23 kilounit/L) had a higher incidence of atopic manifestations than did children in whom IgE was not detectable, but only a weak correlation was found between the occurrence and extent of allergic symptoms and increasing amounts of IgE beyond the 0.23 kilounit/L level. These findings suggest that atopic manifestations in infants may be more dependent on delayed maturation of IgA production than on overproduction of IgE.
dc.language.isoisen
dc.publisherElsiveren
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0022-3476(05)82535-1en
dc.subject.meshHypersensitivity, Immediateen
dc.subject.meshFetal Blooden
dc.subject.meshOtitis Mediaen
dc.subject.meshInfanten
dc.subject.meshImmunoglobulin Aen
dc.subject.meshAshmaen
dc.subject.meshDermatitis, Atopicen
dc.titleCorrelation between serum immunoglobulin A concentrations and allergic manifestations in infantsis
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Immunology and Pediatrics, National University Hospital, Reykjavík, Iceland.en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Pediatricsen
html.description.abstractWe studied the relationship of serum levels of IgA and IgE to allergic manifestations and otitis media in a cohort of 179 Icelandic children, aged 18 to 23 months. Only one of the infants had IgA deficiency (less than 50 micrograms/ml); all the others had IgA levels that were normal for their age. The children were divided into three groups according to their IgA levels (lowest 25%, intermediate 50%, highest 25%) and the clinical findings analyzed accordingly. The cumulative incidence of definite allergic manifestations was 37%. Asthma and otitis media were significantly more common among the infants with low normal IgA levels than among those with intermediate to high IgA levels. There was also a significant association between the severity of allergic manifestations and low IgA levels (p = 0.002). Children with detectable IgE (greater than or equal to 0.23 kilounit/L) had a higher incidence of atopic manifestations than did children in whom IgE was not detectable, but only a weak correlation was found between the occurrence and extent of allergic symptoms and increasing amounts of IgE beyond the 0.23 kilounit/L level. These findings suggest that atopic manifestations in infants may be more dependent on delayed maturation of IgA production than on overproduction of IgE.


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