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dc.contributor.authorTulinius, H
dc.contributor.authorEgilsson, V
dc.contributor.authorOlafsdottir, G H
dc.contributor.authorSigvaldason, H
dc.date.accessioned2011-02-15T13:45:26Z
dc.date.available2011-02-15T13:45:26Z
dc.date.issued1992-10-10
dc.date.submitted2011-02-15
dc.identifier.citationBMJ 1992, 305(6858):855-7en
dc.identifier.issn0959-8138
dc.identifier.pmid1422397
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/121944
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To investigate the risk of prostate, ovarian, and endometrial cancer among relatives of patients with breast cancer. DESIGN: Cohort study of 947 pedigrees in which the proband had breast cancer, linked with the Icelandic cancer registry. SETTING: Iceland. SUBJECTS: The 947 pedigrees included 29,725 people, of whom 1539 had breast cancer, 467 had prostate cancer, 135 ovarian cancer, and 105 endometrial cancer. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Risk of prostate, ovarian, and endometrial cancer among blood relatives of women with breast cancer compared with risk in spouses. RESULTS: The risk of prostate cancer was significantly raised for all relatives (1.5), first degree relatives (1.4), and second degree relatives (1.3) of women with breast cancer. Risk of ovarian cancer was raised for all relatives (1.9) and first degree relatives (1.9) and risk of endometrial cancer was raised for all relatives only (1.9). The risk of prostate cancer was raised if the proband with breast cancer had a first degree relative with prostate cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Coaggregation exists between breast cancer and cancers of the prostate, ovaries, and endometrium. This risk relation is probably based on genes which act by increasing the risk for cancer at these sites. Environmental factors that are common among relatives may also play a part. Continued research is required into pathophysiological mechanisms that could explain these observations.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBritish Medical Associationen
dc.relation.urlhttp://ukpmc.ac.uk/abstract/MED/1422397en
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen
dc.subject.meshBreast Neoplasmsen
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen
dc.subject.meshEndometrial Neoplasmsen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshOvarian Neoplasmsen
dc.subject.meshProstatic Neoplasmsen
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen
dc.titleRisk of prostate, ovarian, and endometrial cancer among relatives of women with breast canceren
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentIcelandic Cancer Registry, Reykjavik.en
dc.identifier.journalBMJ (Clinical research ed.)en
html.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To investigate the risk of prostate, ovarian, and endometrial cancer among relatives of patients with breast cancer. DESIGN: Cohort study of 947 pedigrees in which the proband had breast cancer, linked with the Icelandic cancer registry. SETTING: Iceland. SUBJECTS: The 947 pedigrees included 29,725 people, of whom 1539 had breast cancer, 467 had prostate cancer, 135 ovarian cancer, and 105 endometrial cancer. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Risk of prostate, ovarian, and endometrial cancer among blood relatives of women with breast cancer compared with risk in spouses. RESULTS: The risk of prostate cancer was significantly raised for all relatives (1.5), first degree relatives (1.4), and second degree relatives (1.3) of women with breast cancer. Risk of ovarian cancer was raised for all relatives (1.9) and first degree relatives (1.9) and risk of endometrial cancer was raised for all relatives only (1.9). The risk of prostate cancer was raised if the proband with breast cancer had a first degree relative with prostate cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Coaggregation exists between breast cancer and cancers of the prostate, ovaries, and endometrium. This risk relation is probably based on genes which act by increasing the risk for cancer at these sites. Environmental factors that are common among relatives may also play a part. Continued research is required into pathophysiological mechanisms that could explain these observations.


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