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dc.contributor.authorThorsdottir, I
dc.contributor.authorReykdal, O
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-10T11:57:39Z
dc.date.available2011-03-10T11:57:39Z
dc.date.issued1997-04
dc.date.submitted2011-03-10
dc.identifier.citationScandinavian Journal of Food and Nutrition.1997, 41(4):155-7en
dc.identifier.issn1102-6480
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/124108
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractInsulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is one of the fastest growing diseases in developed countries. All research shedding light on how to prevent IDDM is therefore of great value. The search for scientific explanations has considered genetic and environmental factors where food, especially milk, has come to play a key role. The varying incidence of IDDM among the Nordic countries provides an opportunity to investigate food factors important in the development of dietary recommendations to prevent IDDM. The incidence of IDDM is lower in Iceland than among the genetically related nations of Scandinavia. Recent animal research in New Zealand has pinpointed a specific protein fraction in cow's milk, A 1 β-casein, as one of the possible causes of an immunological destruction of the pancreatic β- cells resulting in IDDM. Milk protein allele frequencies in Nordic cattle breeds varies, and preliminary results indicate that A 1 β-casein is especially low in Icelandic milk
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.foodandnutritionresearch.net/index.php/fnr/article/view/1756/1663en
dc.subject.meshFooden
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshMilken
dc.titleFood and the low incidence of IDDM in Icelanden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalScandinavian Journal of Food and Nutritionen
html.description.abstractInsulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is one of the fastest growing diseases in developed countries. All research shedding light on how to prevent IDDM is therefore of great value. The search for scientific explanations has considered genetic and environmental factors where food, especially milk, has come to play a key role. The varying incidence of IDDM among the Nordic countries provides an opportunity to investigate food factors important in the development of dietary recommendations to prevent IDDM. The incidence of IDDM is lower in Iceland than among the genetically related nations of Scandinavia. Recent animal research in New Zealand has pinpointed a specific protein fraction in cow's milk, A 1 β-casein, as one of the possible causes of an immunological destruction of the pancreatic β- cells resulting in IDDM. Milk protein allele frequencies in Nordic cattle breeds varies, and preliminary results indicate that A 1 β-casein is especially low in Icelandic milk


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