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dc.contributor.authorDimény, E
dc.contributor.authorHultberg, B
dc.contributor.authorWahlberg, J
dc.contributor.authorFellström, B
dc.contributor.authorArnadottir, M
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-14T11:16:12Z
dc.date.available2011-03-14T11:16:12Z
dc.date.issued1998-12
dc.date.submitted2011-03-14
dc.identifier.citationClin Transplant. 1998, 12(6):563-8en
dc.identifier.issn0902-0063
dc.identifier.pmid9850451
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/124455
dc.description.abstractEstablished cardiovascular risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia have been claimed to adversely influence the outcome of renal transplants. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of another risk factor, hyperhomocysteinemia, on graft outcome. This was relevant for two reasons; hyperhomocysteinemia is by now recognized as an independent risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis and it is highly prevalent in both dialysis patients and renal transplant recipients. The serum concentration of total homocysteine (tHcy) was analyzed in samples collected before transplantation in 81 patients and at 6 months after transplantation in 57 of these patients. Before transplantation, mean tHcy was 33.2 +/- 19.2 mumol/L and the prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia was 94%. Six months after transplantation, mean tHcy was 27.7 +/- 14.6 mumol/L and the prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia was 88%. The patients were followed up for 5 yr. Six months and 5 yr after transplantation, serum creatinine concentration and endogenous creatinine clearance were determined. After 6 months, allograft biopsy was evaluated. Neither pre- nor post-transplant tHcy was found to influence patient or graft survival, graft function or histopathology. Thus, tHcy does not seem to predict either short-term or long-term outcome of renal transplantation.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherW.B. Saundersen
dc.subject.meshArteriosclerosisen
dc.subject.meshBiopsy, Needleen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen
dc.subject.meshGraft Survivalen
dc.subject.meshHomocysteineen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshKidneyen
dc.subject.meshKidney Transplantationen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen
dc.titleSerum total homocysteine concentration does not predict outcome in renal transplant recipientsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, Umeå University Hospital, Sweden.en
dc.identifier.journalClinical transplantationen
html.description.abstractEstablished cardiovascular risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia have been claimed to adversely influence the outcome of renal transplants. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of another risk factor, hyperhomocysteinemia, on graft outcome. This was relevant for two reasons; hyperhomocysteinemia is by now recognized as an independent risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis and it is highly prevalent in both dialysis patients and renal transplant recipients. The serum concentration of total homocysteine (tHcy) was analyzed in samples collected before transplantation in 81 patients and at 6 months after transplantation in 57 of these patients. Before transplantation, mean tHcy was 33.2 +/- 19.2 mumol/L and the prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia was 94%. Six months after transplantation, mean tHcy was 27.7 +/- 14.6 mumol/L and the prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia was 88%. The patients were followed up for 5 yr. Six months and 5 yr after transplantation, serum creatinine concentration and endogenous creatinine clearance were determined. After 6 months, allograft biopsy was evaluated. Neither pre- nor post-transplant tHcy was found to influence patient or graft survival, graft function or histopathology. Thus, tHcy does not seem to predict either short-term or long-term outcome of renal transplantation.


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