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dc.contributor.authorThorsdottir, Inga
dc.contributor.authorThorisdottir, Asa V
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-31T14:40:04Z
dc.date.available2011-03-31T14:40:04Z
dc.date.issued2011-03
dc.date.submitted2011-04-31
dc.identifier.citationNestle Nutr Workshop Ser Pediatr Program. 2011, 67:29-40en
dc.identifier.issn1662-3878
dc.identifier.pmid21335988
dc.identifier.doi10.1159/000325573
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/126598
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractCow's milk is a major food for young children. Whole cow's milk is known to be detrimental to infants, mainly due to its low iron content. The negative association with iron status led to recommending the introduction of formula feeding in infancy during the weaning period or when breastfeeding ceased. More recently, the literature suggests that consuming whole cow's milk in infancy has unfortunate effects on growth, especially weight acceleration and development of overweight in childhood. These issues are discussed in the following chapter. Other suggested reasons for the avoidance of whole cow's milk in infancy are touched upon, such as milk protein allergy and high renal solute load. The hypothesis about early cow's milk introduction in the pathology of certain diseases, mainly through the peptide β-casomorphin-7, is briefly reviewed, showing that there is no clear evidence for the suggested associations. The chapter gives a recent example of introducing formula at 6 months of age instead of whole cow's milk in infants' diet in Iceland. Several aspects of consuming whole cow's milk in infancy can be found in recent reviews.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherKrageren
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000325573en
dc.subject.meshAnemia, Iron-Deficiencyen
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen
dc.subject.meshCattleen
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitus, Type 1en
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshInfanten
dc.subject.meshInfant Nutritional Physiological Phenomenaen
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen
dc.subject.meshIron, Dietaryen
dc.subject.meshMilken
dc.subject.meshMilk Hypersensitivityen
dc.subject.meshMilk Proteinsen
dc.subject.meshNutritional Requirementsen
dc.titleWhole cow's milk in early lifeen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUnit for Nutrition Research, Landspitali University Hospital and Faculty of Food Science and Human Nutrition, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Icelanden
dc.identifier.journalNestlé Nutrition workshop series. Paediatric programmeen
html.description.abstractCow's milk is a major food for young children. Whole cow's milk is known to be detrimental to infants, mainly due to its low iron content. The negative association with iron status led to recommending the introduction of formula feeding in infancy during the weaning period or when breastfeeding ceased. More recently, the literature suggests that consuming whole cow's milk in infancy has unfortunate effects on growth, especially weight acceleration and development of overweight in childhood. These issues are discussed in the following chapter. Other suggested reasons for the avoidance of whole cow's milk in infancy are touched upon, such as milk protein allergy and high renal solute load. The hypothesis about early cow's milk introduction in the pathology of certain diseases, mainly through the peptide β-casomorphin-7, is briefly reviewed, showing that there is no clear evidence for the suggested associations. The chapter gives a recent example of introducing formula at 6 months of age instead of whole cow's milk in infants' diet in Iceland. Several aspects of consuming whole cow's milk in infancy can be found in recent reviews.


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