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dc.contributor.authorTomasson, K
dc.contributor.authorKent, D
dc.contributor.authorCoryell, W
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-31T15:40:43Z
dc.date.available2011-03-31T15:40:43Z
dc.date.issued1991-09
dc.date.submitted2011-03-31
dc.identifier.citationActa Psychiatr Scand. 1991, 84(3):288-93en
dc.identifier.issn0001-690X
dc.identifier.pmid1950631
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-0447.1991.tb03146.x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/126610
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractAlthough somatization disorder and conversion disorder are linked in DSM-III and DSM-III-R, they have very different histories. To directly compare these disorders, we reviewed the records accrued for 2 years at a large medical center and identified 65 somatization disorder patients and 51 conversion disorder patients. They differed substantially. The large majority (78%) of conversion disorder patients and nearly all (95%) of the somatization disorder patients were women. Ages at onset occurred throughout the life span among conversion disorder patients but mostly before the age of 21 among the somatization disorder patients. Somatization disorder patients were more likely to have had a history of depression, attempted suicide, panic disorder and divorce.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0447.1991.tb03146.xen
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAge Factorsen
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen
dc.subject.meshConversion Disorderen
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen
dc.subject.meshDepressive Disorderen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIncidenceen
dc.subject.meshIowaen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshPsychiatric Status Rating Scalesen
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen
dc.subject.meshSomatoform Disordersen
dc.titleSomatization and conversion disorders: comorbidity and demographics at presentationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City.en
dc.identifier.journalActa psychiatrica Scandinavicaen
html.description.abstractAlthough somatization disorder and conversion disorder are linked in DSM-III and DSM-III-R, they have very different histories. To directly compare these disorders, we reviewed the records accrued for 2 years at a large medical center and identified 65 somatization disorder patients and 51 conversion disorder patients. They differed substantially. The large majority (78%) of conversion disorder patients and nearly all (95%) of the somatization disorder patients were women. Ages at onset occurred throughout the life span among conversion disorder patients but mostly before the age of 21 among the somatization disorder patients. Somatization disorder patients were more likely to have had a history of depression, attempted suicide, panic disorder and divorce.


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