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dc.contributor.authorSveinbjornsdottir, S
dc.contributor.authorGudmundsson, S
dc.contributor.authorBriem, H
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-19T09:56:28Z
dc.date.available2011-04-19T09:56:28Z
dc.date.issued1991-11
dc.date.submitted2011-04-19
dc.identifier.citationEur. J. Clin. Microbiol. Infect. Dis. 1991, 10(11):959-63en
dc.identifier.issn0934-9723
dc.identifier.pmid1794368
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/BF02005453
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/128335
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractA cross-sectional prevalence study of gram-negative bacillary oropharyngeal colonization in the geriatric population with single oropharyngeal cultures was performed on three different groups of individuals, the first consisting of healthy individuals, living independently, the second residing in a nursing facility and the third hospitalized. A longitudinal incidence study by serial weekly cultures was in addition conducted on a fourth group of hospitalized individuals. In the cross-sectional study, gram-negative bacilli were isolated from 23% of the hospitalized group, whereas only 7-10% of the other two groups were colonized (p less than 0.05). In the longitudinal study, the colonization was intermittent and transient, being most prevalent on admission, i.e. 23%, but gradually decreasing during the hospital stay to 7% after ten weeks. Only hospitalization and prior treatment with antimicrobials increased prevalence of colonization. On only one occasion was a lower respiratory infection predated by oropharyngeal colonization with the same organism, indicating that such colonization may not be a risk factor for the development of pneumonia in the elderly.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringer Verlagen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF02005453en
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshGram-Negative Bacteriaen
dc.subject.meshGram-Negative Bacterial Infectionsen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshLongitudinal Studiesen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshOropharynxen
dc.subject.meshPneumoniaen
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen
dc.titleOropharyngeal colonization in the elderlyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Internal Medicine, Borgarspitalinn (Reykjavik City Hospital), Iceland.en
dc.identifier.journalEuropean journal of clinical microbiology & infectious diseases : official publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiologyen
html.description.abstractA cross-sectional prevalence study of gram-negative bacillary oropharyngeal colonization in the geriatric population with single oropharyngeal cultures was performed on three different groups of individuals, the first consisting of healthy individuals, living independently, the second residing in a nursing facility and the third hospitalized. A longitudinal incidence study by serial weekly cultures was in addition conducted on a fourth group of hospitalized individuals. In the cross-sectional study, gram-negative bacilli were isolated from 23% of the hospitalized group, whereas only 7-10% of the other two groups were colonized (p less than 0.05). In the longitudinal study, the colonization was intermittent and transient, being most prevalent on admission, i.e. 23%, but gradually decreasing during the hospital stay to 7% after ten weeks. Only hospitalization and prior treatment with antimicrobials increased prevalence of colonization. On only one occasion was a lower respiratory infection predated by oropharyngeal colonization with the same organism, indicating that such colonization may not be a risk factor for the development of pneumonia in the elderly.


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