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dc.contributor.authorFjalldal, Sigridur Ben
dc.contributor.authorJanson, Christeren
dc.contributor.authorBenediktsdóttir, Bryndisen
dc.contributor.authorGudmundsson, Gunnaren
dc.contributor.authorBurney, Peteren
dc.contributor.authorBuist, A Soniaen
dc.contributor.authorVollmer, William Men
dc.contributor.authorGislason, Thorarinnen
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-29T09:22:43Z
dc.date.available2011-04-29T09:22:43Z
dc.date.issued2011-04
dc.date.submitted2011-04-29
dc.identifier.citationSmoking, stages of change and decisional balance in Iceland and Sweden. 2011, 5 (2):76-83 Clin Respir Jen
dc.identifier.issn1752-699X
dc.identifier.pmid21410899
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1752-699X.2010.00201.x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/128869
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Smoking remains a significant health problem. Smoking interventions are important but selection of successful quitters can be difficult. Objective: To characterise smokers with emphasis on two constructs of the transtheoretical model, the stages of change and decisional balance. Methods: A random sample from adults aged 40 and over in Reykjavik, Iceland, and Uppsala, Sweden. Smokers were defined as being in the stage of pre-contemplation (not thinking of quitting within the next 6 months), contemplation (thinking of quitting within the next 6 months) or preparation (thinking of quitting within the next 30 days, having managed to quit for at least 24h within the last 12 months). Results: A total of 226 participants were smokers: 72 (32%) were in the pre-contemplation stage, 126 (56%) in the contemplation stage and 28 (12%) in the preparation stage. A younger age, higher body mass index (BMI) and higher educational level were significantly related to being in a more advanced stage. A significant association was observed between decisional balance and stages of change such that decreased importance of the positive aspects of smoking and increased importance of the negative aspects of smoking were independently associated with an increased readiness to quit. Conclusion: The motivated smoker is likely to be young and educated with an above average BMI. A smoker in the contemplation stage is likely to maintain the negative aspects of smoking at a high level. Decreasing the value of the pros of smoking may facilitate the shift towards the stage of preparation
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1752-699X.2010.00201.xen
dc.subject.meshSmoking Cessationen
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshDecision Makingen
dc.subject.meshSwedenen
dc.titleSmoking, stages of change and decisional balance in Iceland and Swedenen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Respiratory Medicine, Allergy and Sleep, Landspitali-University Hospital, Iceland.en
dc.identifier.journalClinical Respiratory Journalen
html.description.abstractIntroduction: Smoking remains a significant health problem. Smoking interventions are important but selection of successful quitters can be difficult. Objective: To characterise smokers with emphasis on two constructs of the transtheoretical model, the stages of change and decisional balance. Methods: A random sample from adults aged 40 and over in Reykjavik, Iceland, and Uppsala, Sweden. Smokers were defined as being in the stage of pre-contemplation (not thinking of quitting within the next 6 months), contemplation (thinking of quitting within the next 6 months) or preparation (thinking of quitting within the next 30 days, having managed to quit for at least 24h within the last 12 months). Results: A total of 226 participants were smokers: 72 (32%) were in the pre-contemplation stage, 126 (56%) in the contemplation stage and 28 (12%) in the preparation stage. A younger age, higher body mass index (BMI) and higher educational level were significantly related to being in a more advanced stage. A significant association was observed between decisional balance and stages of change such that decreased importance of the positive aspects of smoking and increased importance of the negative aspects of smoking were independently associated with an increased readiness to quit. Conclusion: The motivated smoker is likely to be young and educated with an above average BMI. A smoker in the contemplation stage is likely to maintain the negative aspects of smoking at a high level. Decreasing the value of the pros of smoking may facilitate the shift towards the stage of preparation


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