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dc.contributor.authorGudjonsson, Gisli H
dc.contributor.authorSigurdsson, Jon Fridrik
dc.contributor.authorFinnbogadottir, Hildur
dc.contributor.authorSmari, Unnur Jakobsdottir
dc.date.accessioned2007-08-01T11:05:46Z
dc.date.available2007-08-01T11:05:46Z
dc.date.issued2006-10-01
dc.date.submitted2007-08-01
dc.identifier.citationScand J Psychol 2006, 47(5):361-8en
dc.identifier.issn0036-5564
dc.identifier.pmid16987205
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1467-9450.2006.00539.x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/13057
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractThe main aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between a history of having made a false confession and reported parental rearing practices. It was hypothesized that the reporting of rejection and absence of warmth by parents would be associated with the making of a false confession. The participants were 804 college students in Iceland. Each was asked about false confessions made to teachers and parents in the past, as well as about false confessions made to the police during questioning. The participants completed questionnaires relating to perceived parental rearing practices (EMBU), proneness to antisocial behavior (the Gough Socialization Scale), personality (EPQ), self-esteem (Rosenberg), and compliance (GCS). Only eight participants (1% of those interrogated) claimed to have made false confessions to the police, whereas 10% claimed to have made false confessions to teachers or parents. False confessions were significantly associated with proneness to antisocial behavior and the EMBU Rejection and Warmth scales for both fathers and mothers.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBlackwellen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1467-9450.2006.00539.xen
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAntisocial Personality Disorderen
dc.subject.meshParent-Child Relationsen
dc.subject.meshParentingen
dc.subject.meshPoliceen
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen
dc.subject.meshTruth Disclosureen
dc.titleThe relationship between false confessions and perceptions of parental rearing practicesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.format.digYES
html.description.abstractThe main aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between a history of having made a false confession and reported parental rearing practices. It was hypothesized that the reporting of rejection and absence of warmth by parents would be associated with the making of a false confession. The participants were 804 college students in Iceland. Each was asked about false confessions made to teachers and parents in the past, as well as about false confessions made to the police during questioning. The participants completed questionnaires relating to perceived parental rearing practices (EMBU), proneness to antisocial behavior (the Gough Socialization Scale), personality (EPQ), self-esteem (Rosenberg), and compliance (GCS). Only eight participants (1% of those interrogated) claimed to have made false confessions to the police, whereas 10% claimed to have made false confessions to teachers or parents. False confessions were significantly associated with proneness to antisocial behavior and the EMBU Rejection and Warmth scales for both fathers and mothers.


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