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dc.contributor.authorThjodleifsson, B
dc.contributor.authorDavidsdottir, K
dc.contributor.authorAgnarsson, U
dc.contributor.authorSigthorsson, G
dc.contributor.authorKjeld, M
dc.contributor.authorBjarnason, I
dc.date.accessioned2007-11-21T10:52:25Z
dc.date.available2007-11-21T10:52:25Z
dc.date.issued2002-12-01
dc.date.submitted2007-11-21
dc.identifier.citationGut 2002, 51(6):816-7en
dc.identifier.issn0017-5749
dc.identifier.pmid12427783
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/14662
dc.descriptionTo access full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink "Full Text" at the bottom of this pageen
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: The safety of infant vaccination has been questioned in recent years. In particular it has been suggested that the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccination leads to brain damage manifesting as autism consequent to the development of an "enterocolitis" in the immediate post-vaccination period. AIM: To assess if MMR vaccination is associated with subclinical intestinal inflammation, which is central to the autistic "enterocolitis" theory. METHODS: We studied 109/58 infants, before and two and four weeks after immunisation with Pentavac and MMR vaccines, for the presence of intestinal inflammation (faecal calprotectin). RESULTS: Neither vaccination was associated with any significant increase in faecal calprotectin concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: The failure of the MMR vaccination to cause an intestinal inflammatory response provides evidence against the proposed gut-brain interaction that is central to the autistic "enterocolitis" hypothesis.
dc.format.extent124465 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBritish Medical Assnen
dc.relation.urlhttp://gut.bmj.com/cgi/content/abstract/51/6/816en
dc.subject.meshAnalysis of Varianceen
dc.subject.meshBiological Markersen
dc.subject.meshEnterocolitisen
dc.subject.meshLeukocyte L1 Antigen Complexen
dc.subject.meshInfanten
dc.subject.meshLeukocyte L1 Antigen Complexen
dc.subject.meshVaccines, Combineden
dc.subject.meshMeasles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccineen
dc.titleEffect of Pentavac and measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccination on the intestineen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalGuten
dc.format.digYES
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-12T11:45:36Z
html.description.abstractBACKGROUND: The safety of infant vaccination has been questioned in recent years. In particular it has been suggested that the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccination leads to brain damage manifesting as autism consequent to the development of an "enterocolitis" in the immediate post-vaccination period. AIM: To assess if MMR vaccination is associated with subclinical intestinal inflammation, which is central to the autistic "enterocolitis" theory. METHODS: We studied 109/58 infants, before and two and four weeks after immunisation with Pentavac and MMR vaccines, for the presence of intestinal inflammation (faecal calprotectin). RESULTS: Neither vaccination was associated with any significant increase in faecal calprotectin concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: The failure of the MMR vaccination to cause an intestinal inflammatory response provides evidence against the proposed gut-brain interaction that is central to the autistic "enterocolitis" hypothesis.


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