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dc.contributor.authorAmstadter, Ananda B
dc.contributor.authorElwood, Lisa S
dc.contributor.authorBegle, Angela Moreland
dc.contributor.authorGudmundsdottir, Berglind
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Daniel W
dc.contributor.authorResnick, Heidi S
dc.contributor.authorHanson, Rochelle F
dc.contributor.authorSaunders, Benjamin E
dc.contributor.authorKilpatrick, Dean G
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-10T10:10:43Z
dc.date.available2012-05-10T10:10:43Z
dc.date.issued2011-08
dc.date.submitted2012-05-10
dc.identifier.citationAddict Behav. 2011, 36(8):814-20en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1873-6327
dc.identifier.pmid21514060
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.addbeh.2011.03.008
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/222999
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field.en_GB
dc.description.abstractExposure to interpersonal victimization during childhood and adolescence is prevalent and has been found to be associated with negative physical and mental health outcomes. The present study examined the relations between childhood violence exposure and mental health on subsequent exposure to new physical assault in young adults using longitudinal nationally representative, prospective data from the initial (Wave I) and follow-up interviews (Wave II) of the National Survey of Adolescents (NSA). Among the 1,753 participants who completed both assessment time points, 15.8% reported a new physical assault experience at Wave II. Results indicated that racial/ethnic status, gender, history of child physical abuse, witnessed violence drug use, and family drug problems reported at Wave I were all significant predictors of new physical assault. Implications are discussed.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier Scienceen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2011.03.008en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Addictive behaviorsen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshChilden_GB
dc.subject.meshChild Abuseen_GB
dc.subject.meshCrime Victimsen_GB
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshFamilyen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshLongitudinal Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_GB
dc.subject.meshSelf Reporten_GB
dc.subject.meshStress Disorders, Post-Traumaticen_GB
dc.subject.meshSubstance-Related Disordersen_GB
dc.subject.meshUnited Statesen_GB
dc.subject.meshViolenceen_GB
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_GB
dc.titlePredictors of physical assault victimization: findings from the National Survey of Adolescents.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentVirginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Commonwealth University, 800 E. Leigh Street, Richmond, USA. Landspitali The National University Hospital, Reykjavík, Iceland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalAddictive behaviorsen_GB
html.description.abstractExposure to interpersonal victimization during childhood and adolescence is prevalent and has been found to be associated with negative physical and mental health outcomes. The present study examined the relations between childhood violence exposure and mental health on subsequent exposure to new physical assault in young adults using longitudinal nationally representative, prospective data from the initial (Wave I) and follow-up interviews (Wave II) of the National Survey of Adolescents (NSA). Among the 1,753 participants who completed both assessment time points, 15.8% reported a new physical assault experience at Wave II. Results indicated that racial/ethnic status, gender, history of child physical abuse, witnessed violence drug use, and family drug problems reported at Wave I were all significant predictors of new physical assault. Implications are discussed.


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