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dc.contributor.authorDonlon, Sheila
dc.contributor.authorRedmond, Avril
dc.contributor.authorMcCann, Margaret
dc.contributor.authorEinarsdottir, Hildur
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-14T12:04:43Z
dc.date.available2012-05-14T12:04:43Z
dc.date.issued2011-09
dc.date.submitted2012-05-14
dc.identifier.citationJ. Ren. Care. 2011, 37(3):167-73en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1755-6686
dc.identifier.pmid21810199
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1755-6686.2011.00251.x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/223533
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field.en_GB
dc.description.abstractThis third paper, in a three-part CE series on the preventions of infection in patients with chronic kidney disease, focuses on surveillance and auditing of healthcare-associated infections within the renal care environment. The last decade has seen an increased awareness of the threat to patient safety from healthcare-associated infection (HCAI) and the emergence of multi-drug resistance organisms. Effective HCAI prevention strategies include adequate governance structures, access to expert advice, adherence to standard and transmission-based precautions, minimising the use of invasive medical devices, and surveillance. Surveillance data can be collected using outcome (e.g. infection) and/or process (e.g. hand hygiene compliance audit) measures. Establishing a surveillance programme requires: commitment from senior management and the multidisciplinary team, prompt feedback of the data to clinical managers resulting in action been taken if necessary, to address specific areas of concern. While many renal units have access to infection prevention and control expertise to assist in the development of such a programme, units without such expertise should also have a surveillance programme in place.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1755-6686.2011.00251.xen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of renal careen_GB
dc.subject.meshClinical Auditen_GB
dc.subject.meshCross Infectionen_GB
dc.subject.meshHemodialysis Units, Hospitalen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshOutcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)en_GB
dc.subject.meshRenal Insufficiency, Chronicen_GB
dc.titlePrevention of infection in patients with chronic kidney disease part III: surveillance and auditing in a renal care environment.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHealth Protection Surveillance Centre, Dublin, Ireland. sheila.donlon1@hse.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of renal careen_GB
html.description.abstractThis third paper, in a three-part CE series on the preventions of infection in patients with chronic kidney disease, focuses on surveillance and auditing of healthcare-associated infections within the renal care environment. The last decade has seen an increased awareness of the threat to patient safety from healthcare-associated infection (HCAI) and the emergence of multi-drug resistance organisms. Effective HCAI prevention strategies include adequate governance structures, access to expert advice, adherence to standard and transmission-based precautions, minimising the use of invasive medical devices, and surveillance. Surveillance data can be collected using outcome (e.g. infection) and/or process (e.g. hand hygiene compliance audit) measures. Establishing a surveillance programme requires: commitment from senior management and the multidisciplinary team, prompt feedback of the data to clinical managers resulting in action been taken if necessary, to address specific areas of concern. While many renal units have access to infection prevention and control expertise to assist in the development of such a programme, units without such expertise should also have a surveillance programme in place.


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