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dc.contributor.authorEinarsson, Einar-Jón
dc.contributor.authorPetersen, Hannes
dc.contributor.authorWiebe, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorFransson, Per-Anders
dc.contributor.authorMagnusson, Måns
dc.contributor.authorMoëll, Christian
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-14T12:32:00Z
dc.date.available2012-05-14T12:32:00Z
dc.date.issued2011-10
dc.date.submitted2012-05-14
dc.identifier.citationInt. J. Audiol. 2011, 50(10):642en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1499-2027
dc.identifier.issn1708-8186
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/223551
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field.en_GB
dc.description.abstractAbstract: Objective: To investigate word recognition in noise in subjects treated in childhood with chemotherapy, study benefits of open-fitting hearing-aids for word recognition, and investigate whether self-reported hearing-handicap corresponded to subjects' word recognition ability. Design: Subjects diagnosed with cancer and treated with platinum-based chemotherapy in childhood underwent audiometric evaluations. Study Sample: Fifteen subjects (eight females and seven males) fulfilled the criteria set for the study, and four of those received customized open-fitting hearing-aids. Results: Subjects with cisplatin-induced ototoxicity had severe difficulties recognizing words in noise, and scored as low as 54% below reference scores standardized for age and degree of hearing loss. Hearing-impaired subjects' self-reported hearing-handicap correlated significantly with word recognition in a quiet environment but not in noise. Word recognition in noise improved markedly (up to 46%) with hearing-aids, and the self-reported hearing-handicap and disability score were reduced by more than 50%. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the importance of testing word recognition in noise in subjects treated with platinum-based chemotherapy in childhood, and to use specific custom-made questionnaires to evaluate the experienced hearing-handicap. Open-fitting hearing-aids are a good alternative for subjects suffering from poor word recognition in noise.
dc.description.sponsorshipSwedish Research Council Skane County Council's research and development foundationen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInforma Healthcareen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.3109/14992027.2011.585667en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to International Journal of Audiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshSpeech recognitionen_GB
dc.subject.meshOtotoxicityen_GB
dc.subject.meshIntelligibilityen_GB
dc.subject.meshChildrenen_GB
dc.subject.meshAgeen_GB
dc.subject.meshPerceptionen_GB
dc.subject.meshReceptionen_GB
dc.subject.meshScoresen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdultsen_GB
dc.subject.meshYoungen_GB
dc.titleSevere difficulties with word recognition in noise after platinum chemotherapy in childhood, and improvements with open-fitting hearing-aidsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Audiologyen_GB
html.description.abstractAbstract: Objective: To investigate word recognition in noise in subjects treated in childhood with chemotherapy, study benefits of open-fitting hearing-aids for word recognition, and investigate whether self-reported hearing-handicap corresponded to subjects' word recognition ability. Design: Subjects diagnosed with cancer and treated with platinum-based chemotherapy in childhood underwent audiometric evaluations. Study Sample: Fifteen subjects (eight females and seven males) fulfilled the criteria set for the study, and four of those received customized open-fitting hearing-aids. Results: Subjects with cisplatin-induced ototoxicity had severe difficulties recognizing words in noise, and scored as low as 54% below reference scores standardized for age and degree of hearing loss. Hearing-impaired subjects' self-reported hearing-handicap correlated significantly with word recognition in a quiet environment but not in noise. Word recognition in noise improved markedly (up to 46%) with hearing-aids, and the self-reported hearing-handicap and disability score were reduced by more than 50%. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the importance of testing word recognition in noise in subjects treated with platinum-based chemotherapy in childhood, and to use specific custom-made questionnaires to evaluate the experienced hearing-handicap. Open-fitting hearing-aids are a good alternative for subjects suffering from poor word recognition in noise.


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