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dc.contributor.authorvan Cleef, Brigitte A G L
dc.contributor.authorMonnet, Dominique L
dc.contributor.authorVoss, Andreas
dc.contributor.authorKrziwanek, Karina
dc.contributor.authorAllerberger, Franz
dc.contributor.authorStruelens, Marc
dc.contributor.authorZemlickova, Helena
dc.contributor.authorSkov, Robert L
dc.contributor.authorVuopio-Varkila, Jaana
dc.contributor.authorCuny, Christiane
dc.contributor.authorFriedrich, Alexander W
dc.contributor.authorSpiliopoulou, Iris
dc.contributor.authorPászti, Judit
dc.contributor.authorHardardottir, Hjordis
dc.contributor.authorRossney, Angela
dc.contributor.authorPan, Angelo
dc.contributor.authorPantosti, Annalisa
dc.contributor.authorBorg, Michael
dc.contributor.authorGrundmann, Hajo
dc.contributor.authorMueller-Premru, Manica
dc.contributor.authorOlsson-Liljequist, Barbro
dc.contributor.authorWidmer, Andreas
dc.contributor.authorHarbarth, Stephan
dc.contributor.authorSchweiger, Alexander
dc.contributor.authorUnal, Serhat
dc.contributor.authorKluytmans, Jan A J W
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-29T11:01:24Z
dc.date.available2012-05-29T11:01:24Z
dc.date.issued2011-03
dc.date.submitted2012-05-29
dc.identifier.citationEmerging Infect. Dis. 2011, 17(3):502-5en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1080-6059
dc.identifier.pmid21392444
dc.identifier.doi10.3201/eid1703.101036
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/226376
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field.en_GB
dc.description.abstractTo estimate the proportion of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates from humans that were sequence type (ST) 398, we surveyed 24 laboratories in 17 countries in Europe in 2007. Livestock-associated MRSA ST398 accounted for only a small proportion of MRSA isolates from humans; most were from the Netherlands, Belgium, Denmark, and Austria.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNational Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)en_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1703.101036en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Emerging infectious diseasesen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnti-Bacterial Agentsen_GB
dc.subject.meshAustriaen_GB
dc.subject.meshBacterial Typing Techniquesen_GB
dc.subject.meshBelgiumen_GB
dc.subject.meshCattleen_GB
dc.subject.meshDenmarken_GB
dc.subject.meshDisease Reservoirsen_GB
dc.subject.meshEuropeen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshLivestocken_GB
dc.subject.meshMethicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureusen_GB
dc.subject.meshMicrobial Sensitivity Testsen_GB
dc.subject.meshNetherlandsen_GB
dc.subject.meshPolymerase Chain Reactionen_GB
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_GB
dc.subject.meshStaphylococcal Infectionsen_GB
dc.subject.meshSwineen_GB
dc.titleLivestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in humans, Europe.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentEpidemiology and Surveillance Unit, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands. brigitte.van.cleef@rivm.nlen_GB
dc.identifier.journalEmerging infectious diseasesen_GB
html.description.abstractTo estimate the proportion of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates from humans that were sequence type (ST) 398, we surveyed 24 laboratories in 17 countries in Europe in 2007. Livestock-associated MRSA ST398 accounted for only a small proportion of MRSA isolates from humans; most were from the Netherlands, Belgium, Denmark, and Austria.


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