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dc.contributor.authorThorisdottir, Asa V
dc.contributor.authorThorsdottir, Inga
dc.contributor.authorPalsson, Gestur I
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-29T11:33:04Z
dc.date.available2012-05-29T11:33:04Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.date.submitted2012-05-29
dc.identifier.citationAnemia 2011, 2011:986303en_GB
dc.identifier.issn2090-1275
dc.identifier.pmid21785718
dc.identifier.doi10.1155/2011/986303
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/226399
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field.en_GB
dc.description.abstractA previous study showed low iron status in 12-month-old Icelandic infants associated most strongly with cow's milk intake and growth. Infant dietary recommendations were revised in 2003. This study investigated nutrition and iron status in a new infant cohort. Subjects/Methods. Randomly selected infants were prospectively investigated for diet, anthropometry, and iron status (n = 110-141). Results. Breastfeeding initiation rate was 98%; 38% of 5-month olds were exclusively and 20% of 12-month olds partially breastfed. Formula was given to 21% of 6-month olds and 64% of 12-month olds, but cow's milk to 2.5% and 54.4% of 6- and 12-month olds, respectively. Iron depletion (serum ferritin < 12 μg/L) affected 5.8%, 1.4% were also iron deficient (MCV < 74 fl), and none were anemic (Hb < 105 g/l). Iron status associated negatively with growth and breastfeeding duration and positively with meat and formula intake at 9-12 months, but not with cow's milk. Conclusion. Improved iron status might be explained by a shift from cow's milk to formula in the diet of Icelandic 6-12-month olds. Dietary changes altered associations between foods and iron status.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherHindawi Pub. Corpen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3139868/?tool=pubmeden_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Anemiaen_GB
dc.titleNutrition and Iron Status of 1-Year Olds following a Revision in Infant Dietary Recommendations.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUnit for Nutrition Research, Landspitali-The National University Hospital of Iceland, Eiríksgata 29, 101 Reykjavik, Iceland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalAnemiaen_GB
html.description.abstractA previous study showed low iron status in 12-month-old Icelandic infants associated most strongly with cow's milk intake and growth. Infant dietary recommendations were revised in 2003. This study investigated nutrition and iron status in a new infant cohort. Subjects/Methods. Randomly selected infants were prospectively investigated for diet, anthropometry, and iron status (n = 110-141). Results. Breastfeeding initiation rate was 98%; 38% of 5-month olds were exclusively and 20% of 12-month olds partially breastfed. Formula was given to 21% of 6-month olds and 64% of 12-month olds, but cow's milk to 2.5% and 54.4% of 6- and 12-month olds, respectively. Iron depletion (serum ferritin < 12 μg/L) affected 5.8%, 1.4% were also iron deficient (MCV < 74 fl), and none were anemic (Hb < 105 g/l). Iron status associated negatively with growth and breastfeeding duration and positively with meat and formula intake at 9-12 months, but not with cow's milk. Conclusion. Improved iron status might be explained by a shift from cow's milk to formula in the diet of Icelandic 6-12-month olds. Dietary changes altered associations between foods and iron status.


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