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dc.contributor.authorSigurdardottir, Thorgerdur
dc.contributor.authorSteingrimsdottir, Thora
dc.contributor.authorArnason, Arni
dc.contributor.authorBø, Kari
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-05T15:07:04Z
dc.date.available2012-06-05T15:07:04Z
dc.date.issued2011-12
dc.date.submitted2012-06-05
dc.identifier.citationInt. Urogynecol. J. 2011, 22(12):1497-503en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1433-3023
dc.identifier.pmid21789656
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00192-011-1518-9
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/227576
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field.en_GB
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: Pregnancy and vaginal delivery are considered to be the main risk factors for development of pelvic floor dysfunction. We hypothesize that; 1) pelvic floor muscle (PFM) strength and endurance is significantly reduced by first delivery in general, and 2) changes in PFM strength and endurance are influenced by mode of delivery. METHODS: Prospective repeated measures observational study. Thirty-six women completed the study. PFM function was measured as vaginal squeeze pressure. Paired t-test was used to compare PFM function before and after first childbirth for all participants as a group. One-way ANOVA was used to compare changes between different modes of delivery. RESULTS: A significant reduction in PFM strength (p < 0.0001) and endurance (p < 0.0001) was found for all participants after first childbirth. The reduction in strength was 20.1 hPa (CI:16.2; 24.1), 31.4 hPa (CI: 7.4; 55.2) 5.2 hPa (CI: -6.6; 17.0) in the normal vaginal, instrumental vaginal and acute cesarean groups, respectively. The difference was significant between normal vaginal and acute cesarean birth (p = 0.028) and instrumental vaginal and acute cesarean birth (p = 0.003). CONCLUSION: PFM strength is significantly reduced after vaginal delivery, both normal and instrumental, 6 to 12 weeks postpartum. Acute cesarean section resulted in significantly less muscle strength reduction.
dc.description.sponsorshipAssociation of Icelandic Physiotherapists Icelandic Association of University Womenen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00192-011-1518-9en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to International urogynecology journalen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshCesarean Sectionen_GB
dc.subject.meshDelivery, Obstetricen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshMuscle Strengthen_GB
dc.subject.meshMusclesen_GB
dc.subject.meshParturitionen_GB
dc.subject.meshPelvic Flooren_GB
dc.subject.meshPostpartum Perioden_GB
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen_GB
dc.titlePelvic floor muscle function before and after first childbirth.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Physiotherapy, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Stapi, Hringbraut 31, 101, Reykjavik, Iceland. th.sigurdardottir@gmail.comen_GB
dc.identifier.journalInternational urogynecology journalen_GB
html.description.abstractINTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: Pregnancy and vaginal delivery are considered to be the main risk factors for development of pelvic floor dysfunction. We hypothesize that; 1) pelvic floor muscle (PFM) strength and endurance is significantly reduced by first delivery in general, and 2) changes in PFM strength and endurance are influenced by mode of delivery. METHODS: Prospective repeated measures observational study. Thirty-six women completed the study. PFM function was measured as vaginal squeeze pressure. Paired t-test was used to compare PFM function before and after first childbirth for all participants as a group. One-way ANOVA was used to compare changes between different modes of delivery. RESULTS: A significant reduction in PFM strength (p < 0.0001) and endurance (p < 0.0001) was found for all participants after first childbirth. The reduction in strength was 20.1 hPa (CI:16.2; 24.1), 31.4 hPa (CI: 7.4; 55.2) 5.2 hPa (CI: -6.6; 17.0) in the normal vaginal, instrumental vaginal and acute cesarean groups, respectively. The difference was significant between normal vaginal and acute cesarean birth (p = 0.028) and instrumental vaginal and acute cesarean birth (p = 0.003). CONCLUSION: PFM strength is significantly reduced after vaginal delivery, both normal and instrumental, 6 to 12 weeks postpartum. Acute cesarean section resulted in significantly less muscle strength reduction.


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