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dc.contributor.authorHilmarsdóttir, I
dc.contributor.authorBaldvinsdóttir, G E
dc.contributor.authorHarðardóttir, H
dc.contributor.authorBriem, H
dc.contributor.authorSigurðsson, S I
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-14T10:12:33Z
dc.date.available2012-08-14T10:12:33Z
dc.date.issued2012-07
dc.date.submitted2012-08-14
dc.identifier.citationEur. J. Clin. Microbiol. Infect. Dis. 2012, 31 (7):1501-9en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1435-4373
dc.identifier.pmid22057365
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10096-011-1470-0
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/238391
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field.en_GB
dc.description.abstractThe epidemiology of infectious diarrhea influences the microbiological investigation of the disease, and is best elucidated through prospective studies. We undertook such a study in a Nordic country. Patients of all age groups who had acute diarrhea were recruited prospectively from general practice clinics in Iceland. They completed a questionnaire and provided stool samples for the detection of pathogenic viruses, bacteria, and parasites. Of the 464 recruited patients, 211 (45%) had 224 infections. The most common pathogens were calici- and rotaviruses (23% and 18% of 224 infections, respectively), Campylobacter jejuni (17%), Cryptosporidium species (12%), and Salmonella serotypes (10%). Other agents found were Giardia lamblia, astro- and adenoviruses, and Yersinia enterocolitica. Viral pathogens were associated with vomiting, illness for ≤7 days, and younger age groups, while bacterial pathogens were associated with fever, rectal pain, and local or foreign travel, and parasitic pathogens with illness for >7 days. Detection rates for viral infections in the elderly and for Cryptosporidium species were higher than expected. Our study indicates the existence of regional differences in pathogen prevalence that should be taken into account when implementing guidelines for stool testing in patients with acute diarrheal disease.
dc.description.sponsorshipLandspitali University Hospital, Icelandic Centre for Research, University of Iceland,en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10096-011-1470-0en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to European journal of clinical microbiology & infectious diseases : official publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiologyen_GB
dc.titleEnteropathogens in acute diarrhea: a general practice-based study in a Nordic country.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Microbiology, Landspítali-The National University Hospital of Iceland, University of Iceland, Barónsstígur, 101, Reykjavík, Icelanden_GB
dc.identifier.journalEuropean journal of clinical microbiology & infectious diseases : official publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiologyen_GB
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren
dc.type.categorySýklafræði, Veirufræðien_GB
html.description.abstractThe epidemiology of infectious diarrhea influences the microbiological investigation of the disease, and is best elucidated through prospective studies. We undertook such a study in a Nordic country. Patients of all age groups who had acute diarrhea were recruited prospectively from general practice clinics in Iceland. They completed a questionnaire and provided stool samples for the detection of pathogenic viruses, bacteria, and parasites. Of the 464 recruited patients, 211 (45%) had 224 infections. The most common pathogens were calici- and rotaviruses (23% and 18% of 224 infections, respectively), Campylobacter jejuni (17%), Cryptosporidium species (12%), and Salmonella serotypes (10%). Other agents found were Giardia lamblia, astro- and adenoviruses, and Yersinia enterocolitica. Viral pathogens were associated with vomiting, illness for ≤7 days, and younger age groups, while bacterial pathogens were associated with fever, rectal pain, and local or foreign travel, and parasitic pathogens with illness for >7 days. Detection rates for viral infections in the elderly and for Cryptosporidium species were higher than expected. Our study indicates the existence of regional differences in pathogen prevalence that should be taken into account when implementing guidelines for stool testing in patients with acute diarrheal disease.


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