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dc.contributor.authorGudmundsson, Ottar
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-14T12:05:24Z
dc.date.available2012-08-14T12:05:24Z
dc.date.issued2012-03
dc.date.submitted2012-08-14
dc.identifier.citationNord. J. Psychiatry 2012, 66(Suppl 1):25-30en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1502-4725
dc.identifier.pmid22283837
dc.identifier.doi10.3109/08039488.2012.654509
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/238424
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field.en_GB
dc.description.abstractThe history of Icelandic psychiatry is in many ways comparable with neighboring countries. Mentally ill people were badly treated in the country and received no medical treatment until at the beginning of the 20th century. Kleppur Hospital for the mentally insane was built in 1907; hence the development was approximately 150 years later than in comparable countries. Only two doctors contributed significantly to policy making in Icelandic psychiatry until 1959 and they were very different personalities. Dr Thórdur Sveinsson was famous for his interest in hydrotherapy and Dr Helgi Tómasson for his prohibition of all physical restraints like straitjackets, restraining straps and belts. He was also known for his decision to prohibit his patients undergoing ECT and lobotomy; hence such methods were never practiced at Kleppur Hospital. In other respects, it may be said that the history of Icelandic psychiatry is similar to that in the other Nordic countries.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInforma Healthcareen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.3109/08039488.2012.654509en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Nordic journal of psychiatryen_GB
dc.subject.meshHistory, 15th Centuryen_GB
dc.subject.meshHistory, 16th Centuryen_GB
dc.subject.meshHistory, 17th Centuryen_GB
dc.subject.meshHistory, 18th Centuryen_GB
dc.subject.meshHistory, 19th Centuryen_GB
dc.subject.meshHistory, 20th Centuryen_GB
dc.subject.meshHistory, 21st Centuryen_GB
dc.subject.meshHistory, Medievalen_GB
dc.subject.meshHospitals, Psychiatricen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIcelanden_GB
dc.subject.meshMental Disordersen_GB
dc.subject.meshPsychiatryen_GB
dc.titleHistory of Icelandic psychiatry.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentMental Health Services, Landspítali-The National University Hospital of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. ottarg@landspitali.isen_GB
dc.identifier.journalNordic journal of psychiatryen_GB
dc.rights.accessLandspitali Access - LSH-aðganguren
dc.type.categoryGeðlæknisfræðien_GB
html.description.abstractThe history of Icelandic psychiatry is in many ways comparable with neighboring countries. Mentally ill people were badly treated in the country and received no medical treatment until at the beginning of the 20th century. Kleppur Hospital for the mentally insane was built in 1907; hence the development was approximately 150 years later than in comparable countries. Only two doctors contributed significantly to policy making in Icelandic psychiatry until 1959 and they were very different personalities. Dr Thórdur Sveinsson was famous for his interest in hydrotherapy and Dr Helgi Tómasson for his prohibition of all physical restraints like straitjackets, restraining straps and belts. He was also known for his decision to prohibit his patients undergoing ECT and lobotomy; hence such methods were never practiced at Kleppur Hospital. In other respects, it may be said that the history of Icelandic psychiatry is similar to that in the other Nordic countries.


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