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dc.contributor.authorOlafsson, Ingvar H
dc.contributor.authorVilhjalmsson, Dadi Th
dc.contributor.authorThormodsson, Finnbogi R
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-14T14:29:51Z
dc.date.available2012-08-14T14:29:51Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.submitted2012-08-14
dc.identifier.citationMethods Mol. Biol. 2012, 849:245-59en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1940-6029
dc.identifier.pmid22528095
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-1-61779-551-0_17
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/238493
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field.en_GB
dc.description.abstractCerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) results from amyloid accumulation within arteries of the cerebral cortex and leptomeninges. This condition is age-related, especially prevalent in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and the main feature of certain hereditary disorders (i.e., HCHWA-I). The vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) appear to play a vital role in the development of CAA, which makes them well suited as an experimental model to study the disease and screen for possible remedies. We describe two different methods for isolating and culturing human VSMCs. First, using the human umbilical cord as an easy source of robust cells, and secondly, using brain tissue that provides the proper cerebral VSMCs, but is more problematic to work with. The umbilical cord also provides human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs), useful primary cells for vascular research. Finally, the maintenance, preservation, and characterization of the isolated vascular cells are described.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringer Verlagen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-61779-551-0_17en_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.springerlink.com/content/rg6540ug71852784/#section=1066991&page=1en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.)en_GB
dc.subject.meshCell Counten_GB
dc.subject.meshCell Culture Techniquesen_GB
dc.subject.meshCell Separationen_GB
dc.subject.meshCryopreservationen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshMuscle, Smooth, Vascularen_GB
dc.subject.meshUmbilical Corden_GB
dc.titlePreparation of cultured human vascular cells.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentLandspitali The National University Hospital, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalMethods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.)en_GB
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren
dc.type.categoryHeila- og taugaskurðlæknisfræðien_GB
html.description.abstractCerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) results from amyloid accumulation within arteries of the cerebral cortex and leptomeninges. This condition is age-related, especially prevalent in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and the main feature of certain hereditary disorders (i.e., HCHWA-I). The vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) appear to play a vital role in the development of CAA, which makes them well suited as an experimental model to study the disease and screen for possible remedies. We describe two different methods for isolating and culturing human VSMCs. First, using the human umbilical cord as an easy source of robust cells, and secondly, using brain tissue that provides the proper cerebral VSMCs, but is more problematic to work with. The umbilical cord also provides human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs), useful primary cells for vascular research. Finally, the maintenance, preservation, and characterization of the isolated vascular cells are described.


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