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dc.contributor.authorSteingrimsdottir, Laufey
dc.contributor.authorGunnarsson, Orvar
dc.contributor.authorIndridason, Olafur S
dc.contributor.authorFranzson, Leifur
dc.contributor.authorSigurdsson, Gunnar
dc.date.accessioned2006-05-17T15:01:34Z
dc.date.available2006-05-17T15:01:34Z
dc.date.issued2005-11-09
dc.identifier.citationJAMA 2005, 294(18):2336-41en
dc.identifier.issn1538-3598
dc.identifier.pmid16278362
dc.identifier.doi10.1001/jama.294.18.2336
dc.identifier.otherEND12en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/2791
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractCONTEXT: Adequate vitamin D status for optimum bone health has received increased recognition in recent years; however, the ideal intake is not known. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D is the generally accepted indicator of vitamin D status, but no universal reference level has been reached. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relative importance of high calcium intake and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D for calcium homeostasis, as determined by serum intact parathyroid hormone (PTH). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Cross-sectional study of 2310 healthy Icelandic adults who were divided equally into 3 age groups (30-45 years, 50-65 years, or 70-85 years) and recruited from February 2001 to January 2003. They were administered a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire, which assessed vitamin D and calcium intake. Participants were further divided into groups according to calcium intake (<800 mg/d, 800-1200 mg/d, and >1200 mg/d) and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level (<10 ng/mL, 10-18 ng/mL, and >18 ng/mL). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Serum intact PTH as determined by calcium intake and vitamin D. RESULTS: A total of 944 healthy participants completed all parts of the study. After adjusting for relevant factors, serum PTH was lowest in the group with a serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level of more than 18 ng/mL but highest in the group with a serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level of less than 10 ng/mL. At the low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level (<10 ng/mL), calcium intake of less than 800 mg/d vs more than 1200 mg/d was significantly associated with higher serum PTH (P = .04); and at a calcium intake of more than 1200 mg/d, there was a significant difference between the lowest and highest vitamin D groups (P = .04). CONCLUSIONS: As long as vitamin D status is ensured, calcium intake levels of more than 800 mg/d may be unnecessary for maintaining calcium metabolism. Vitamin D supplements are necessary for adequate vitamin D status in northern climates.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican Medical Associationen
dc.relation.urlhttp://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/full/294/18/2336en
dc.subjectAdulten
dc.subjectAgeden
dc.subjectAged, 80 and overen
dc.subjectCalciumen
dc.subjectCross-Sectional Studiesen
dc.subjectDiet Surveysen
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectMiddle Ageden
dc.subjectParathyroid Hormoneen
dc.subjectVitamin Den
dc.titleRelationship between serum parathyroid hormone levels, vitamin D sufficiency, and calcium intakeen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.format.digYES
html.description.abstractCONTEXT: Adequate vitamin D status for optimum bone health has received increased recognition in recent years; however, the ideal intake is not known. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D is the generally accepted indicator of vitamin D status, but no universal reference level has been reached. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relative importance of high calcium intake and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D for calcium homeostasis, as determined by serum intact parathyroid hormone (PTH). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Cross-sectional study of 2310 healthy Icelandic adults who were divided equally into 3 age groups (30-45 years, 50-65 years, or 70-85 years) and recruited from February 2001 to January 2003. They were administered a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire, which assessed vitamin D and calcium intake. Participants were further divided into groups according to calcium intake (<800 mg/d, 800-1200 mg/d, and >1200 mg/d) and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level (<10 ng/mL, 10-18 ng/mL, and >18 ng/mL). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Serum intact PTH as determined by calcium intake and vitamin D. RESULTS: A total of 944 healthy participants completed all parts of the study. After adjusting for relevant factors, serum PTH was lowest in the group with a serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level of more than 18 ng/mL but highest in the group with a serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level of less than 10 ng/mL. At the low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level (<10 ng/mL), calcium intake of less than 800 mg/d vs more than 1200 mg/d was significantly associated with higher serum PTH (P = .04); and at a calcium intake of more than 1200 mg/d, there was a significant difference between the lowest and highest vitamin D groups (P = .04). CONCLUSIONS: As long as vitamin D status is ensured, calcium intake levels of more than 800 mg/d may be unnecessary for maintaining calcium metabolism. Vitamin D supplements are necessary for adequate vitamin D status in northern climates.


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