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dc.contributor.authorEmilsson, Ossur Ingi
dc.contributor.authorJanson, Christer
dc.contributor.authorBenediktsdóttir, Bryndís
dc.contributor.authorJúlíusson, Sigurdur
dc.contributor.authorGíslason, Thórarinn
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-13T15:16:52Z
dc.date.available2013-08-13T15:16:52Z
dc.date.issued2012-03
dc.date.submitted2013-08-13
dc.identifier.citationRespir Med 2012, 106(3):459-66en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1532-3064
dc.identifier.pmid22197048
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.rmed.2011.12.004
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/298079
dc.description.abstractNocturnal gastroesophageal reflux (nGER) has received increasing interest as a predisposing factor for respiratory diseases and sleep disturbances. The possible role of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) contributing to nGER is of special interest. The aim of this study was to explore the association between nGER and respiratory diseases, lung function and symptoms of OSA. Participants in the Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease (BOLD) initiative in Iceland and Sweden, a random sample from the general population of 1325 adults aged 40+ (>70% response rate), were compared by pre- and post-bronchodilator spirometry, answers to questionnaires about OSA and respiratory symptoms, health, and symptoms of GER. Altogether 102 (7.7%) reported nGER and 249 had used medication against GER. The participants were divided into three groups: 1) No nGER (n = 1040), 2) treated GER without nGER (n = 183) and 3) nGER (n = 102). The nGER group had a significantly higher prevalence of respiratory and OSA symptoms than subjects without nGER. The nGER group also had a higher prevalence of COPD (GOLD stage 1+), (25.0% vs. 15.6%) (p = 0.02) and lower FEV(1)/FVC ratio (95.9% vs. 98.9% of the predicted, p = 0.01). These associations remained significant after adjusting for smoking, weight and other possible confounders. No independent association was found between having treated GER and lung function, respiratory or OSA symptoms. In our cross-sectional epidemiological study, untreated nGER is strongly associated with both respiratory and OSA symptoms as well as airflow obstruction.
dc.description.sponsorshipLandspitali-University Astra Zeneca in Iceland GlaxoSmithKline in Iceland Swedish Heart and Lung Foundation Swedish Heart and Lung Association GlaxoSmithKline, Swedenen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rmed.2011.12.004en_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0954611111004458en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Respiratory medicineen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshAge Factorsen_GB
dc.subject.meshAgeden_GB
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen_GB
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshForced Expiratory Volumeen_GB
dc.subject.meshGastroesophageal Refluxen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIcelanden_GB
dc.subject.meshLungen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshRespiration Disordersen_GB
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen_GB
dc.subject.meshSleep Apnea, Obstructiveen_GB
dc.subject.meshSpirometryen_GB
dc.subject.meshSwedenen_GB
dc.subject.meshVital Capacityen_GB
dc.titleNocturnal gastroesophageal reflux, lung function and symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea: Results from an epidemiological survey.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentFaculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Vatnsmyrarvegur 16, 101 Reykjavik, Icelanden_GB
dc.identifier.journalRespiratory medicineen_GB
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren
html.description.abstractNocturnal gastroesophageal reflux (nGER) has received increasing interest as a predisposing factor for respiratory diseases and sleep disturbances. The possible role of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) contributing to nGER is of special interest. The aim of this study was to explore the association between nGER and respiratory diseases, lung function and symptoms of OSA. Participants in the Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease (BOLD) initiative in Iceland and Sweden, a random sample from the general population of 1325 adults aged 40+ (>70% response rate), were compared by pre- and post-bronchodilator spirometry, answers to questionnaires about OSA and respiratory symptoms, health, and symptoms of GER. Altogether 102 (7.7%) reported nGER and 249 had used medication against GER. The participants were divided into three groups: 1) No nGER (n = 1040), 2) treated GER without nGER (n = 183) and 3) nGER (n = 102). The nGER group had a significantly higher prevalence of respiratory and OSA symptoms than subjects without nGER. The nGER group also had a higher prevalence of COPD (GOLD stage 1+), (25.0% vs. 15.6%) (p = 0.02) and lower FEV(1)/FVC ratio (95.9% vs. 98.9% of the predicted, p = 0.01). These associations remained significant after adjusting for smoking, weight and other possible confounders. No independent association was found between having treated GER and lung function, respiratory or OSA symptoms. In our cross-sectional epidemiological study, untreated nGER is strongly associated with both respiratory and OSA symptoms as well as airflow obstruction.


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