Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGeorgsdottir, Ingibjorg
dc.contributor.authorErlingsdottir, Gigja
dc.contributor.authorHrafnkelsson, Birgir
dc.contributor.authorHaraldsson, Asgeir
dc.contributor.authorDagbjartsson, Atli
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-16T11:54:55Z
dc.date.available2013-08-16T11:54:55Z
dc.date.issued2012-05
dc.date.submitted2013-08-16
dc.identifier.citationActa Paediatr. 2012, 101(5):518-23en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1651-2227
dc.identifier.pmid22211629
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1651-2227.2011.02576.x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/298974
dc.description.abstractEvaluation of long-term outcome of extremely low-birthweight (ELBW) teenagers born in Iceland in 1991-1995. Participants, 30 of 35 ELBW survivors and 30 full term control teenagers (14-19 years), were assessed for disabilities, health problems and learning difficulties. Results of national standardized tests in mathematics and Icelandic language were compared with results of neurodevelopmental assessment at 5 years of age. A quarter of the ELBW teenagers had disabilities. All were initially diagnosed with neurodevelopmental disorders early in life and neurosensory and/or intellectual disabilities were confirmed later in childhood. Chronic lung disorders, neurological problems and psychiatric disorders were most common health problems. Growth parameters were within normal limits for most of the ELBW teenagers. Learning difficulties affected 57% of the ELBW teenagers, 20% attended special education classes and 37% required special teaching. Results of national standardized tests were significantly lower for ELBW survivors and were significantly related to the results of neurodevelopmental assessment at 5 years of age. A quarter of ELBW teenagers have disabilities albeit most of them mild. Chronic health problems and learning difficulties affect many ELBW survivors. Changes with time emphasize need of long-term follow-up.
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Iceland State Diagnostic and Counselling Centreen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1651-2227.2011.02576.xen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1651-2227.2011.02576.x/pdfen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Acta paediatrica (Oslo, Norway : 1992)en_GB
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_GB
dc.subject.meshDevelopmental Disabilitiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshHealth Statusen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIcelanden_GB
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen_GB
dc.subject.meshInfant, Very Low Birth Weighten_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_GB
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_GB
dc.titleDisabilities and health of extremely low-birthweight teenagers: a population-based study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentThe State Diagnostic and Counselling Centre, Kopavogur, Icelanden_GB
dc.identifier.journalActa paediatricaen_GB
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren
html.description.abstractEvaluation of long-term outcome of extremely low-birthweight (ELBW) teenagers born in Iceland in 1991-1995. Participants, 30 of 35 ELBW survivors and 30 full term control teenagers (14-19 years), were assessed for disabilities, health problems and learning difficulties. Results of national standardized tests in mathematics and Icelandic language were compared with results of neurodevelopmental assessment at 5 years of age. A quarter of the ELBW teenagers had disabilities. All were initially diagnosed with neurodevelopmental disorders early in life and neurosensory and/or intellectual disabilities were confirmed later in childhood. Chronic lung disorders, neurological problems and psychiatric disorders were most common health problems. Growth parameters were within normal limits for most of the ELBW teenagers. Learning difficulties affected 57% of the ELBW teenagers, 20% attended special education classes and 37% required special teaching. Results of national standardized tests were significantly lower for ELBW survivors and were significantly related to the results of neurodevelopmental assessment at 5 years of age. A quarter of ELBW teenagers have disabilities albeit most of them mild. Chronic health problems and learning difficulties affect many ELBW survivors. Changes with time emphasize need of long-term follow-up.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record