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dc.contributor.authorJonsdottir, Olof H
dc.contributor.authorThorsdottir, Inga
dc.contributor.authorHibberd, Patricia L
dc.contributor.authorFewtrell, Mary S
dc.contributor.authorWells, Jonathan C
dc.contributor.authorPalsson, Gestur I
dc.contributor.authorLucas, Alan
dc.contributor.authorGunnlaugsson, Geir
dc.contributor.authorKleinman, Ronald E
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-27T11:31:23Z
dc.date.available2013-08-27T11:31:23Z
dc.date.issued2012-12
dc.date.submitted2013-08-27
dc.identifier.citationPediatrics 2012, 130(6):1038-45en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1098-4275
dc.identifier.pmid23147979
dc.identifier.doi10.1542/peds.2011-3838
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/299935
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field.en_GB
dc.description.abstractTo increase knowledge on iron status and growth during the first 6 months of life. We hypothesized that iron status would be better in infants who received complementary foods in addition to breast milk compared with those exclusively breastfed. One hundred nineteen healthy term (≥37 weeks) singleton infants were randomly assigned to receive either complementary foods in addition to breast milk from age 4 months (CF) or to exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months (EBF). Dietary data were collected by 3-day weighed food records, and data on iron status and growth were also collected. One hundred infants (84%) completed the trial. Infants in the CF group had higher mean serum ferritin levels at 6 months (P = .02), which remained significant when adjusted for baseline characteristics. No difference was seen between groups in iron deficiency anemia, iron deficiency, or iron depletion. The average daily energy intake from complementary foods of 5-month-olds in the CF group was 36.8 kJ per kg body weight. Infants in both groups grew at the same rate between 4 and 6 months of age. In a high-income country, adding a small amount of complementary food in addition to breast milk to infants' diets from 4 months of age does not affect growth rate between 4 and 6 months, but has a small and positive effect on iron status at 6 months. The biological importance of this finding remains to be determined.
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institutes of Health Mead Johnson Eimskip Fund of the University of Iceland Primary Health Care Organisation in Reykjavik Capital Area Primary Health Care Organisation in Akranes Primary Health Care Organisation in Sudurnes participating health centersen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2011-3838en_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/130/6/1038en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Pediatricsen_GB
dc.subject.meshAge Factorsen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnemia, Iron-Deficiencyen_GB
dc.subject.meshBody Heighten_GB
dc.subject.meshBody Weighten_GB
dc.subject.meshBreast Feedingen_GB
dc.subject.meshCephalometryen_GB
dc.subject.meshErythrocyte Indicesen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshFerritinsen_GB
dc.subject.meshHemoglobinometryen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIcelanden_GB
dc.subject.meshInfanten_GB
dc.subject.meshInfant Nutritional Physiological Phenomenaen_GB
dc.subject.meshIron, Dietaryen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshNutritional Requirementsen_GB
dc.titleTiming of the introduction of complementary foods in infancy: a randomized controlled trial.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUnit for Nutrition Research, Landspitali, The National University Hospital of Iceland, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalPediatricsen_GB
dc.rights.accessLandspitali Access - LSH-aðganguren
html.description.abstractTo increase knowledge on iron status and growth during the first 6 months of life. We hypothesized that iron status would be better in infants who received complementary foods in addition to breast milk compared with those exclusively breastfed. One hundred nineteen healthy term (≥37 weeks) singleton infants were randomly assigned to receive either complementary foods in addition to breast milk from age 4 months (CF) or to exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months (EBF). Dietary data were collected by 3-day weighed food records, and data on iron status and growth were also collected. One hundred infants (84%) completed the trial. Infants in the CF group had higher mean serum ferritin levels at 6 months (P = .02), which remained significant when adjusted for baseline characteristics. No difference was seen between groups in iron deficiency anemia, iron deficiency, or iron depletion. The average daily energy intake from complementary foods of 5-month-olds in the CF group was 36.8 kJ per kg body weight. Infants in both groups grew at the same rate between 4 and 6 months of age. In a high-income country, adding a small amount of complementary food in addition to breast milk to infants' diets from 4 months of age does not affect growth rate between 4 and 6 months, but has a small and positive effect on iron status at 6 months. The biological importance of this finding remains to be determined.


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