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dc.contributor.authorLudviksdottir, Dora
dc.contributor.authorDiamant, Zuzana
dc.contributor.authorAlving, Kjell
dc.contributor.authorBjermer, Leif
dc.contributor.authorMalinovschi, Andrei
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-02T11:19:38Z
dc.date.available2013-09-02T11:19:38Z
dc.date.issued2012-10
dc.date.submitted2013-09-02
dc.identifier.citationClin Respir J 2012, 6(4):193-207en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1752-699X
dc.identifier.pmid22898078
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/crj.12001
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/300628
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field.en_GB
dc.description.abstractCurrent guidelines recommend tailoring of asthma management according to disease control, which is largely defined by increased symptoms and deterioration in lung function. These features do not reflect the severity nor the type of the asthmatic airway inflammation. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FE(NO)) is a simple, non-invasive and cost-effective online test applicable in both adults and children. In addition to symptoms and lung function measurements, FE(NO) reflects airway eosinophilia and hence allows online assessment of the corticosteroid-sensitive T helper 2 type airway inflammation in asthmatic patients. FE(NO) can thus be applied to aid asthma diagnosis and treatment monitoring both in clinical practice and for research purposes. The scope of this review is to provide an overview of the most important clinical studies using FE(NO) in asthma management and to summarise the implications of FE(NO) measurements in clinical practice. In several studies, FE(NO) measurements provided additional information on aspects of asthma including phenotyping, corticosteroid-responsiveness and disease control. Thus, if correctly applied and interpreted, FE(NO) can aid asthma diagnosis, identify patients at risk of exacerbation and support customized treatment decisions. A simple and reliable tool to quantify peripheral nitric oxide will further aid to identify patients with small airways inflammation.
dc.description.sponsorshipAerocrine AstraZeneca AstraZeneca and GlaxoSmithKlein Almirall Airsonette Andre Pharma Boehringer GlaxoSmithKlein GlaxoSmithKlein, Merck Mundipharma Niigard Novartis Nycomed/Takeda Orion Pharmaen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/crj.12001en_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/crj.12001/pdfen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The clinical respiratory journalen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdrenal Cortex Hormonesen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshAnti-Asthmatic Agentsen_GB
dc.subject.meshAsthmaen_GB
dc.subject.meshBreath Testsen_GB
dc.subject.meshChilden_GB
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_GB
dc.subject.meshDisease Progressionen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMonitoring, Physiologicen_GB
dc.subject.meshNitric Oxideen_GB
dc.subject.meshPredictive Value of Testsen_GB
dc.subject.meshRespiratory Function Testsen_GB
dc.subject.meshRisk Assessmenten_GB
dc.subject.meshSensitivity and Specificityen_GB
dc.subject.meshSeverity of Illness Indexen_GB
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_GB
dc.titleClinical aspects of using exhaled NO in asthma diagnosis and management.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalClinical respiratory journalen_GB
dc.rights.accessOpen Access - Opinn aðganguren
html.description.abstractCurrent guidelines recommend tailoring of asthma management according to disease control, which is largely defined by increased symptoms and deterioration in lung function. These features do not reflect the severity nor the type of the asthmatic airway inflammation. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FE(NO)) is a simple, non-invasive and cost-effective online test applicable in both adults and children. In addition to symptoms and lung function measurements, FE(NO) reflects airway eosinophilia and hence allows online assessment of the corticosteroid-sensitive T helper 2 type airway inflammation in asthmatic patients. FE(NO) can thus be applied to aid asthma diagnosis and treatment monitoring both in clinical practice and for research purposes. The scope of this review is to provide an overview of the most important clinical studies using FE(NO) in asthma management and to summarise the implications of FE(NO) measurements in clinical practice. In several studies, FE(NO) measurements provided additional information on aspects of asthma including phenotyping, corticosteroid-responsiveness and disease control. Thus, if correctly applied and interpreted, FE(NO) can aid asthma diagnosis, identify patients at risk of exacerbation and support customized treatment decisions. A simple and reliable tool to quantify peripheral nitric oxide will further aid to identify patients with small airways inflammation.


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