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dc.contributor.authorSvansdottir, Erla
dc.contributor.authorvan den Broek, Krista C
dc.contributor.authorKarlsson, Hrobjartur D
dc.contributor.authorGudnason, Thorarinn
dc.contributor.authorDenollet, Johan
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-16T14:26:30Z
dc.date.available2013-09-16T14:26:30Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.submitted2013-09-16
dc.identifier.citationBMC Public Health 2012, 12:42en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1471-2458
dc.identifier.pmid22251667
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2458-12-42
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/301615
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field.en_GB
dc.description.abstractType D (distressed) personality has been associated with adverse cardiac prognosis and poor emotional well-being in cardiac patients, but it is still unclear what mechanisms link Type D personality with poor clinical outcomes in cardiac patients. In the present cohort of Icelandic cardiac patients, we examined potential pathways that may explain this relationship. The objectives were to examine 1) the association between Type D personality and impaired psychological status, and to explore whether this association is independent of disease severity; and 2) the association between Type D personality and an unhealthy lifestyle. A sample of 268 Icelandic coronary angiography patients (74% males (N = 199); mean age 62.9 years (SD 10.5), range 28-85 years) completed the Type D Scale (DS14), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) at hospitalization. Health-related behaviors were assessed 4 months following angiography. Clinical data were collected from medical files. Type D personality was associated with an increased risk of anxiety (OR 2.97, 95% CI:1.55-5.69), depression (OR 4.01, 95% CI:1.42-11.29), and stress (OR 5.99, 95% CI:3.08-11.63), independent of demographic variables and disease severity. Furthermore, fish consumption was lower among Type Ds, as 21% of Type Ds versus 5% of non-Type Ds consumed fish < 1 a week (p < 0.001). Type D patients were also more likely to smoke at follow-up (22% versus 10%, p = 0.024) and to use antidepressants (17% versus 9%, p = 0.049) and sleeping pills (49% versus 33%, p = 0.019) compared to non-Type Ds. Type D personality was not associated with other health-related behaviors, aside from trends towards less fruit and vegetable consumption, and more weight gain. Type D personality was associated with psychological distress and an unhealthy lifestyle in Icelandic cardiac patients. Future studies should further investigate the association between Type D personality and health-related behaviors.
dc.description.sponsorshipRannis Icelandic Centre for Research (Reykjavik, Iceland) Landspitali-Hospital Research Found (Reykjavik, Iceland) Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (The Hague, The Netherlands) VICI 453-04-004 Landspitali-University Hospitalen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-12-42en_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2458/12/42en_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3398279/en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to BMC public healthen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshAgeden_GB
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen_GB
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHeart Diseasesen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIcelanden_GB
dc.subject.meshLife Styleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_GB
dc.subject.meshPersonalityen_GB
dc.subject.meshRisk-Takingen_GB
dc.subject.meshStress, Psychologicalen_GB
dc.titleType D personality is associated with impaired psychological status and unhealthy lifestyle in Icelandic cardiac patients: a cross-sectional study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCoRPS--Center of Research on Psychology in Somatic diseases, Tilburg University, 5000 LE Tilburg, The Netherlands.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalBMC public healthen_GB
dc.rights.accessOpen Access - Opinn aðganguren
html.description.abstractType D (distressed) personality has been associated with adverse cardiac prognosis and poor emotional well-being in cardiac patients, but it is still unclear what mechanisms link Type D personality with poor clinical outcomes in cardiac patients. In the present cohort of Icelandic cardiac patients, we examined potential pathways that may explain this relationship. The objectives were to examine 1) the association between Type D personality and impaired psychological status, and to explore whether this association is independent of disease severity; and 2) the association between Type D personality and an unhealthy lifestyle. A sample of 268 Icelandic coronary angiography patients (74% males (N = 199); mean age 62.9 years (SD 10.5), range 28-85 years) completed the Type D Scale (DS14), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) at hospitalization. Health-related behaviors were assessed 4 months following angiography. Clinical data were collected from medical files. Type D personality was associated with an increased risk of anxiety (OR 2.97, 95% CI:1.55-5.69), depression (OR 4.01, 95% CI:1.42-11.29), and stress (OR 5.99, 95% CI:3.08-11.63), independent of demographic variables and disease severity. Furthermore, fish consumption was lower among Type Ds, as 21% of Type Ds versus 5% of non-Type Ds consumed fish < 1 a week (p < 0.001). Type D patients were also more likely to smoke at follow-up (22% versus 10%, p = 0.024) and to use antidepressants (17% versus 9%, p = 0.049) and sleeping pills (49% versus 33%, p = 0.019) compared to non-Type Ds. Type D personality was not associated with other health-related behaviors, aside from trends towards less fruit and vegetable consumption, and more weight gain. Type D personality was associated with psychological distress and an unhealthy lifestyle in Icelandic cardiac patients. Future studies should further investigate the association between Type D personality and health-related behaviors.


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