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dc.contributor.authorSteingrimsson, Steinn
dc.contributor.authorGottfredsson, Magnus
dc.contributor.authorKristinsson, Karl G
dc.contributor.authorGudbjartsson, Tomas
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-27T15:09:47Z
dc.date.available2008-06-27T15:09:47Z
dc.date.issued2008-06-01
dc.date.submitted2008-06-27
dc.identifier.citationScand. Cardiovasc. J. 2008, 42(3):208-13en
dc.identifier.issn1401-7431
dc.identifier.pmid18569953
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/14017430801919557
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/30562
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractObjective. The aim of this nationwide case-control study was to study the epidemiology and identify risk factors of deep sternal wound infections (DSWI) in Iceland. Patients and methods. Between 1997-2004, 1 650 adults underwent open cardiac surgery in Iceland. For every infected patient four control subjects were chosen (n =163), matched for time of operation. The groups were compared by multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results. Forty one patients (2.5%) developed DSWI, most often following CABG (76%). The most common pathogens were Staphylococcus aureus (39%) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (24%). All except two patients underwent debridement and rewiring of the sternum. Length of hospital stay was significantly longer in the DSWI group with a trend for increased hospital mortality and significantly greater 1-year mortality (17% vs. 5%, p =0.02). History of stroke (OR 5.12), peripheral arterial disease (OR 5), corticosteroid use (OR 4.25), smoking (OR 3.66) and re-operation for bleeding (OR 4.66) were the strongest independent predictors for DSWI. Conclusion. Incidence of DSWI in Iceland (2.5%) is comparable to other recently published studies, with similar risk factors and significantly reduced survival at one year following the infection.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.informaworld.com/10.1080/14017430801919557en
dc.subject.meshThoracic Surgeryen
dc.subject.meshSurgical Wound Infectionen
dc.subject.meshMediastinitisen
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen
dc.subject.meshPeripheral Vascular Diseasesen
dc.subject.meshStaphylococcus aureusen
dc.subject.meshMediastinitisen
dc.subject.meshSternumen
dc.titleDeep sternal wound infections following open heart surgery in Iceland. A population-based studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.en
dc.identifier.journalScandinavian cardiovascular journal : SCJen
html.description.abstractObjective. The aim of this nationwide case-control study was to study the epidemiology and identify risk factors of deep sternal wound infections (DSWI) in Iceland. Patients and methods. Between 1997-2004, 1 650 adults underwent open cardiac surgery in Iceland. For every infected patient four control subjects were chosen (n =163), matched for time of operation. The groups were compared by multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results. Forty one patients (2.5%) developed DSWI, most often following CABG (76%). The most common pathogens were Staphylococcus aureus (39%) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (24%). All except two patients underwent debridement and rewiring of the sternum. Length of hospital stay was significantly longer in the DSWI group with a trend for increased hospital mortality and significantly greater 1-year mortality (17% vs. 5%, p =0.02). History of stroke (OR 5.12), peripheral arterial disease (OR 5), corticosteroid use (OR 4.25), smoking (OR 3.66) and re-operation for bleeding (OR 4.66) were the strongest independent predictors for DSWI. Conclusion. Incidence of DSWI in Iceland (2.5%) is comparable to other recently published studies, with similar risk factors and significantly reduced survival at one year following the infection.


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