• CNVs conferring risk of autism or schizophrenia affect cognition in controls.

      Stefansson, Hreinn; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Steinberg, Stacy; Magnusdottir, Brynja; Morgen, Katrin; Arnarsdottir, Sunna; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Walters, G Bragi; Jonsdottir, Gudrun A; Doyle, Orla M; et al. (NPG, 2014)
      In a small fraction of patients with schizophrenia or autism, alleles of copy-number variants (CNVs) in their genomes are probably the strongest factors contributing to the pathogenesis of the disease. These CNVs may provide an entry point for investigations into the mechanisms of brain function and dysfunction alike. They are not fully penetrant and offer an opportunity to study their effects separate from that of manifest disease. Here we show in an Icelandic sample that a few of the CNVs clearly alter fecundity (measured as the number of children by age 45). Furthermore, we use various tests of cognitive function to demonstrate that control subjects carrying the CNVs perform at a level that is between that of schizophrenia patients and population controls. The CNVs do not all affect the same cognitive domains, hence the cognitive deficits that drive or accompany the pathogenesis vary from one CNV to another. Controls carrying the chromosome 15q11.2 deletion between breakpoints 1 and 2 (15q11.2(BP1-BP2) deletion) have a history of dyslexia and dyscalculia, even after adjusting for IQ in the analysis, and the CNV only confers modest effects on other cognitive traits. The 15q11.2(BP1-BP2) deletion affects brain structure in a pattern consistent with both that observed during first-episode psychosis in schizophrenia and that of structural correlates in dyslexia.
    • Prevalence and prognosis of unrecognized myocardial infarction determined by cardiac magnetic resonance in older adults.

      Schelbert, Erik B; Cao, Jie J; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Aspelund, Thor; Kellman, Peter; Aletras, Anthony H; Dyke, Christopher K; Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Launer, Lenore J; et al. (2012-09-05)
      Unrecognized myocardial infarction (MI) is prognostically important. Electrocardiography (ECG) has limited sensitivity for detecting unrecognized MI (UMI). Determine prevalence and mortality risk for UMI detected by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging or ECG among older individuals. ICELAND MI is a cohort substudy of the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study (enrollment January 2004-January 2007) using ECG or CMR to detect UMI. From a community-dwelling cohort of older individuals in Iceland, data for 936 participants aged 67 to 93 years were analyzed, including 670 who were randomly selected and 266 with diabetes. Prevalence and mortality of MI through September 1, 2011. Results reported with 95% confidence limits and net reclassification improvement (NRI). Of 936 participants, 91 had recognized MI (RMI) (9.7%; 95% CI, 8% to 12%), and 157 had UMI detected by CMR (17%; 95% CI, 14% to 19%), which was more prevalent than the 46 UMI detected by ECG (5%; 95% CI, 4% to 6%; P < .001). Participants with diabetes (n = 337) had more UMI detected by CMR than by ECG (n = 72; 21%; 95% CI, 17% to 26%, vs n = 15; 4%; 95% CI, 2% to 7%; P < .001). Unrecognized MI by CMR was associated with atherosclerosis risk factors, coronary calcium, coronary revascularization, and peripheral vascular disease. Over a median of 6.4 years, 30 of 91 participants (33%; 95% CI, 23% to 43%) with RMI died, and 44 of 157 participants (28%; 95% CI, 21% to 35%) with UMI died, both higher rates than the 119 of 688 participants (17%; 95% CI, 15% to 20%) with no MI who died. Unrecognized MI by CMR improved risk stratification for mortality over RMI (NRI, 0.34; 95% CI, 0.16 to 0.53). Adjusting for age, sex, diabetes, and RMI, UMI by CMR remained associated with mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 1.45; 95% CI, 1.02 to 2.06, absolute risk increase [ARI], 8%) and significantly improved risk stratification for mortality (NRI, 0.16; 95% CI, 0.01 to 0.31), but UMI by ECG did not (HR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.45 to 1.73; ARI, -2%; NRI, -0.05; 95% CI, -0.17 to 0.05). Compared with those with RMI, participants with UMI by CMR used cardiac medications such as statins less often (36%; 95% CI, 28% to 43%, or 56/157, vs 73%; 95% CI, 63% to 82%, or 66/91; P < .001). In a community-based cohort of older individuals, the prevalence of UMI by CMR was higher than the prevalence of RMI and was associated with increased mortality risk. In contrast, UMI by ECG prevalence was lower than that of RMI and was not associated with increased mortality risk.