• A detailed genome-wide reconstruction of mouse metabolism based on human Recon 1

      Sigurdsson, Martin I; Jamshidi, Neema; Steingrimsson, Eirikur; Thiele, Ines; Palsson, Bernhard Ø; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. (BioMed Central Ltd., 2010-10)
      BACKGROUND: Well-curated and validated network reconstructions are extremely valuable tools in systems biology. Detailed metabolic reconstructions of mammals have recently emerged, including human reconstructions. They raise the question if the various successful applications of microbial reconstructions can be replicated in complex organisms. RESULTS: We mapped the published, detailed reconstruction of human metabolism (Recon 1) to other mammals. By searching for genes homologous to Recon 1 genes within mammalian genomes, we were able to create draft metabolic reconstructions of five mammals, including the mouse. Each draft reconstruction was created in compartmentalized and non-compartmentalized version via two different approaches. Using gap-filling algorithms, we were able to produce all cellular components with three out of four versions of the mouse metabolic reconstruction. We finalized a functional model by iterative testing until it passed a predefined set of 260 validation tests. The reconstruction is the largest, most comprehensive mouse reconstruction to-date, accounting for 1,415 genes coding for 2,212 gene-associated reactions and 1,514 non-gene-associated reactions.We tested the mouse model for phenotype prediction capabilities. The majority of predicted essential genes were also essential in vivo. However, our non-tissue specific model was unable to predict gene essentiality for many of the metabolic genes shown to be essential in vivo. Our knockout simulation of the lipoprotein lipase gene correlated well with experimental results, suggesting that softer phenotypes can also be simulated. CONCLUSIONS: We have created a high-quality mouse genome-scale metabolic reconstruction, iMM1415 (Mus Musculus, 1415 genes). We demonstrate that the mouse model can be used to perform phenotype simulations, similar to models of microbe metabolism. Since the mouse is an important experimental organism, this model should become an essential tool for studying metabolic phenotypes in mice, including outcomes from drug screening.
    • European genome-wide association study identifies SLC14A1 as a new urinary bladder cancer susceptibility gene.

      Rafnar, Thorunn; Vermeulen, Sita H; Sulem, Patrick; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Aben, Katja K; Witjes, J Alfred; Grotenhuis, Anne J; Verhaegh, Gerald W; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, Christina A; Besenbacher, Soren; et al. (Oxford University Press, 2011-11-01)
      Three genome-wide association studies in Europe and the USA have reported eight urinary bladder cancer (UBC) susceptibility loci. Using extended case and control series and 1000 Genomes imputations of 5 340 737 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we searched for additional loci in the European GWAS. The discovery sample set consisted of 1631 cases and 3822 controls from the Netherlands and 603 cases and 37 781 controls from Iceland. For follow-up, we used 3790 cases and 7507 controls from 13 sample sets of European and Iranian ancestry. Based on the discovery analysis, we followed up signals in the urea transporter (UT) gene SLC14A. The strongest signal at this locus was represented by a SNP in intron 3, rs17674580, that reached genome-wide significance in the overall analysis of the discovery and follow-up groups: odds ratio = 1.17, P = 7.6 × 10(-11). SLC14A1 codes for UTs that define the Kidd blood group and are crucial for the maintenance of a constant urea concentration gradient in the renal medulla and, through this, the kidney's ability to concentrate urine. It is speculated that rs17674580, or other sequence variants in LD with it, indirectly modifies UBC risk by affecting urine production. If confirmed, this would support the 'urogenous contact hypothesis' that urine production and voiding frequency modify the risk of UBC.
    • Ion mobility derived collision cross sections to support metabolomics applications.

      Paglia, Giuseppe; Williams, Jonathan P; Menikarachchi, Lochana; Thompson, J Will; Tyldesley-Worster, Richard; Halldórsson, Skarphédinn; Rolfsson, Ottar; Moseley, Arthur; Grant, David; Langridge, James; et al. (Amer Chemical Soc, 2014-04-15)
      Metabolomics is a rapidly evolving analytical approach in life and health sciences. The structural elucidation of the metabolites of interest remains a major analytical challenge in the metabolomics workflow. Here, we investigate the use of ion mobility as a tool to aid metabolite identification. Ion mobility allows for the measurement of the rotationally averaged collision cross-section (CCS), which gives information about the ionic shape of a molecule in the gas phase. We measured the CCSs of 125 common metabolites using traveling-wave ion mobility-mass spectrometry (TW-IM-MS). CCS measurements were highly reproducible on instruments located in three independent laboratories (RSD < 5% for 99%). We also determined the reproducibility of CCS measurements in various biological matrixes including urine, plasma, platelets, and red blood cells using ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled with TW-IM-MS. The mean RSD was < 2% for 97% of the CCS values, compared to 80% of retention times. Finally, as proof of concept, we used UPLC-TW-IM-MS to compare the cellular metabolome of epithelial and mesenchymal cells, an in vitro model used to study cancer development. Experimentally determined and computationally derived CCS values were used as orthogonal analytical parameters in combination with retention time and accurate mass information to confirm the identity of key metabolites potentially involved in cancer. Thus, our results indicate that adding CCS data to searchable databases and to routine metabolomics workflows will increase the identification confidence compared to traditional analytical approaches.
    • Monitoring metabolites consumption and secretion in cultured cells using ultra-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-ToF-MS).

      Paglia, Giuseppe; Hrafnsdóttir, Sigrún; Magnúsdóttir, Manuela; Fleming, Ronan M T; Thorlacius, Steinunn; Palsson, Bernhard Ø; Thiele, Ines; Univ Iceland, Ctr Syst Biol, Fac Ind Engn Mech Engn & Comp Sci, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland (Springer Heidelberg, 2012-01)
      Here we present an ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) method for extracellular measurements of known and unexpected metabolites in parallel. The method was developed by testing 86 metabolites, including amino acids, organic acids, sugars, purines, pyrimidines, vitamins, and nucleosides, that can be resolved by combining chromatographic and m/z dimensions. Subsequently, a targeted quantitative method was developed for 80 metabolites. The presented method combines a UPLC approach using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) and MS detection achieved by a hybrid quadrupole-time of flight (Q-ToF) mass spectrometer. The optimal setup was achieved by evaluating reproducibility and repeatability of the analytical platforms using pooled quality control samples to minimize the drift in instrumental performance over time. Then, the method was validated by analyzing extracellular metabolites from acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines (MOLT-4 and CCRF-CEM) treated with direct (A-769662) and indirect (AICAR) AMP activated kinase (AMPK) activators, monitoring uptake and secretion of the targeted compound over time. This analysis pointed towards a perturbed purine and pyrimidine catabolism upon AICAR treatment. Our data suggest that the method presented can be used for qualitative and quantitative analysis of extracellular metabolites and it is suitable for routine applications such as in vitro drug screening.
    • Shared genetic susceptibility to ischemic stroke and coronary artery disease: a genome-wide analysis of common variants.

      Dichgans, Martin; Malik, Rainer; König, Inke R; Rosand, Jonathan; Clarke, Robert; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Mitchell, Braxton D; Assimes, Themistocles L; Levi, Christopher; et al. (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2014-01)
      Ischemic stroke (IS) and coronary artery disease (CAD) share several risk factors and each has a substantial heritability. We conducted a genome-wide analysis to evaluate the extent of shared genetic determination of the two diseases.