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dc.contributor.authorArnardottir, Hildur H
dc.contributor.authorFreysdottir, Jona
dc.contributor.authorHardardottir, Ingibjorg
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-07T14:30:29Z
dc.date.available2014-02-07T14:30:29Z
dc.date.issued2013-01
dc.identifier.citationJ. Nutr. Biochem. 2013, 24 (1):248-55en
dc.identifier.issn1873-4847
dc.identifier.pmid22902325
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jnutbio.2012.05.012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/312375
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field.en
dc.description.abstractOmega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids may have beneficial effects in inflammation, where neutrophil migration and activation are of importance. The effects of dietary fish oil on neutrophil numbers and subpopulations in healthy mice and mice with endotoxin-induced inflammation were determined. Mice were fed a control diet with or without 2.8% fish oil, and half of them were injected intraperitoneally with endotoxin. Blood, peritoneal lavage, bone marrow and spleen were collected. Expression of cell surface molecules was analyzed by flow cytometry, and chemokine concentrations were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Dietary fish oil did not alter the proportion of total neutrophils in blood but increased the proportion of a specific subpopulation of neutrophils 48 h following endotoxin administration. This subpopulation of neutrophils expressed higher levels of CD11b, Ly6G and major histocompatibility complex-II, suggesting a different role for these neutrophils in the inflammatory response. Dietary fish oil did not affect neutrophil numbers in the peritoneum of healthy mice, but 12 h after endotoxin administration, there were fewer neutrophils in the peritoneum of mice fed the fish oil diet than in mice fed the control diet. However, 48 h after endotoxin administration, mice fed the fish oil diet had more neutrophils in peritoneum than mice fed the control diet. These results indicate that, although dietary fish oil may delay recruitment of neutrophils from blood to the peritoneum early in inflammation, it has the potential to increase the number of peritoneal neutrophils later, which may be of benefit as impaired neutrophil migration and activation have been associated with immunosuppression late in inflammation.
dc.description.sponsorshipIcelandic Research Fund, University of Iceland Research Funden
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier Scienceen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jnutbio.2012.05.012en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0955286312001556en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The Journal of nutritional biochemistryen
dc.subjectLýsien
dc.subjectLífhimnubólgaen
dc.subjectMýsen
dc.subjectRannsókniren
dc.subject.meshAnimals
dc.subject.meshAntigens, CD11b
dc.subject.meshAntigens, Ly
dc.subject.meshChemokine CXCL1
dc.subject.meshChemokine CXCL2
dc.subject.meshEndotoxins
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshFish Oils
dc.subject.meshMice
dc.subject.meshMice, Inbred C57BL
dc.subject.meshNeutrophils
dc.subject.meshPeritoneum
dc.subject.meshPeritonitis
dc.titleDietary fish oil increases the proportion of a specific neutrophil subpopulation in blood and total neutrophils in peritoneum of mice following endotoxin-induced inflammation.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Iceland, Dept Biochem & Mol Biol, Fac Med, Biomed Ctr, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland, Landspitali Univ Hosp Iceland, Dept Immunol, Reykjavik, Iceland, Landspitali Univ Hosp Iceland, Ctr Rheumatol Res, Reykjavik, Iceland, Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Dept Immunol, Biomed Ctr, IS-101 Reykjavik, Icelanden
dc.identifier.journalJournal of nutritional biochemistryen
html.description.abstractOmega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids may have beneficial effects in inflammation, where neutrophil migration and activation are of importance. The effects of dietary fish oil on neutrophil numbers and subpopulations in healthy mice and mice with endotoxin-induced inflammation were determined. Mice were fed a control diet with or without 2.8% fish oil, and half of them were injected intraperitoneally with endotoxin. Blood, peritoneal lavage, bone marrow and spleen were collected. Expression of cell surface molecules was analyzed by flow cytometry, and chemokine concentrations were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Dietary fish oil did not alter the proportion of total neutrophils in blood but increased the proportion of a specific subpopulation of neutrophils 48 h following endotoxin administration. This subpopulation of neutrophils expressed higher levels of CD11b, Ly6G and major histocompatibility complex-II, suggesting a different role for these neutrophils in the inflammatory response. Dietary fish oil did not affect neutrophil numbers in the peritoneum of healthy mice, but 12 h after endotoxin administration, there were fewer neutrophils in the peritoneum of mice fed the fish oil diet than in mice fed the control diet. However, 48 h after endotoxin administration, mice fed the fish oil diet had more neutrophils in peritoneum than mice fed the control diet. These results indicate that, although dietary fish oil may delay recruitment of neutrophils from blood to the peritoneum early in inflammation, it has the potential to increase the number of peritoneal neutrophils later, which may be of benefit as impaired neutrophil migration and activation have been associated with immunosuppression late in inflammation.


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