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dc.contributor.authorChang, Milan
dc.contributor.authorSaczynski, Jane S
dc.contributor.authorSnaedal, Jon
dc.contributor.authorBjornsson, Sigurbjorn
dc.contributor.authorEinarsson, Bjorn
dc.contributor.authorGarcia, Melissa
dc.contributor.authorAspelund, Thor
dc.contributor.authorSiggeirsdottir, Kristine
dc.contributor.authorGudnason, Vilmundur
dc.contributor.authorLauner, Lenore J
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Tamara B
dc.contributor.authorJonsson, Palmi V
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-13T08:53:30Z
dc.date.available2014-02-13T08:53:30Z
dc.date.issued2013-02
dc.date.submitted2013
dc.identifier.citationJ Am Geriatr Soc. 2013, 61 (2):237-42en
dc.identifier.issn1532-5415
dc.identifier.pmid23320618
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/jgs.12077
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/312760
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field.en
dc.description.abstractTo examine the long-term association between midlife physical activity (PA) and lower extremity function (LEF) in late life.
dc.description.abstractLongitudinal study with an average of 25 years of follow-up.
dc.description.abstractCommunity-dwelling old population in Reykjavik, Iceland.
dc.description.abstractFour thousand seven hundred fifty-three community-dwelling men and women (mean age 76 ± 6) in Reykjavik, Iceland.
dc.description.abstractOn the basis of weekly hours of regular PA reported at the midlife examination, participants were classified as active or inactive. Measures of LEF in late life were gait speed on a 6-m walk, Timed Up and Go (TUG), and knee extension (KE) strength tests. Linear regression analysis was used to examine the association.
dc.description.abstractParticipants who were active in midlife had significantly better LEF (faster gait speed, β = 0.50, P ≤ .001; faster TUG time, β = -0.53 P ≤ .001; stronger KE strength, β = 1.3, P ≤ .001) in late life than those who were not active in midlife after adjusting for sociodemographic and cardiovascular risk factors. After adjustment for cognitive function in late life (speed of processing, memory, and executive function), participants who were active in midlife had significantly faster gait speed (β = 0.04, P ≤ .001), faster TUG time (β = -0.34, P ≤ .001), and greater KE strength (β = 0.87, P ≤ .001) in old age than those who were not active in midlife.
dc.description.abstractRegular PA in midlife is associated with better performance of LEF in later life, even after controlling for late-life cognitive function.
dc.description.sponsorshipIntramural Research Program of the National Institutes of Healthen
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institute on Aging/N01-AG-12100en
dc.description.sponsorshipIcelandic Heart Associationen
dc.description.sponsorshipLandspitali University Hospitalen
dc.description.sponsorshipIcelandic Parliamenten
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jgs.12077en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of the American Geriatrics Societyen
dc.subjectAldraðiren
dc.subjectHreyfifærnien
dc.subjectElliglöpen
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAgingen
dc.subject.meshCognition Disordersen
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Exposureen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshForecastingen
dc.subject.meshGenetic Predisposition to Diseaseen
dc.subject.meshGeriatric Assessmenten
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshLower Extremityen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMorbidityen
dc.subject.meshMotor Activityen
dc.titleMidlife physical activity preserves lower extremity function in older adults: age gene/environment susceptibility-Reykjavik study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentLandspitali Univ Hosp, Geriatr Res Ctr, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland, Univ Massachusetts, Sch Med, Dept Med, Worcester, MA USA, Univ Massachusetts, Sch Med, Meyers Primary Care Inst, Worcester, MA USA, Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland, Univ Iceland, Fac Sci, Reykjavik, Iceland, Iceland Heart Assoc, Kopavogur, Iceland, NIA, Lab Epidemiol Demog & Biometry, Bethesda, MD 20892 USAen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the American Geriatrics Societyen
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren
html.description.abstractTo examine the long-term association between midlife physical activity (PA) and lower extremity function (LEF) in late life.
html.description.abstractLongitudinal study with an average of 25 years of follow-up.
html.description.abstractCommunity-dwelling old population in Reykjavik, Iceland.
html.description.abstractFour thousand seven hundred fifty-three community-dwelling men and women (mean age 76 ± 6) in Reykjavik, Iceland.
html.description.abstractOn the basis of weekly hours of regular PA reported at the midlife examination, participants were classified as active or inactive. Measures of LEF in late life were gait speed on a 6-m walk, Timed Up and Go (TUG), and knee extension (KE) strength tests. Linear regression analysis was used to examine the association.
html.description.abstractParticipants who were active in midlife had significantly better LEF (faster gait speed, β = 0.50, P ≤ .001; faster TUG time, β = -0.53 P ≤ .001; stronger KE strength, β = 1.3, P ≤ .001) in late life than those who were not active in midlife after adjusting for sociodemographic and cardiovascular risk factors. After adjustment for cognitive function in late life (speed of processing, memory, and executive function), participants who were active in midlife had significantly faster gait speed (β = 0.04, P ≤ .001), faster TUG time (β = -0.34, P ≤ .001), and greater KE strength (β = 0.87, P ≤ .001) in old age than those who were not active in midlife.
html.description.abstractRegular PA in midlife is associated with better performance of LEF in later life, even after controlling for late-life cognitive function.


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