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dc.contributor.authorGudjonsson, Gisli H
dc.contributor.authorSigurdsson, Jon Fridrik
dc.contributor.authorAdalsteinsson, Tomas F
dc.contributor.authorYoung, Susan
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-20T13:38:02Z
dc.date.available2014-02-20T13:38:02Z
dc.date.issued2013-05
dc.date.submitted2013
dc.identifier.citationJ Atten Disord 2013, 17(4):339-46en
dc.identifier.issn1557-1246
dc.identifier.pmid22290695
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1087054711429791
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/313104
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field.en
dc.description.abstractTo investigate the relative importance of ADHD symptoms, mood instability, and antisocial personality disorder traits in predicting self-reported offending.
dc.description.abstractA total of 295 Icelandic students completed two scales of offending behavior and measures of ADHD symptoms, mood instability, and antisocial personality traits.
dc.description.abstractSelf-reported offending from the two independent scales correlated significantly with ADHD symptoms, mood instability, and antisocial personality traits with medium to large effect size. Multiple regressions showed that ADHD symptoms contributed to the two outcome measures beyond that of age and gender with a medium effect size. The ADHD effects were only partly mediated by mood instability and antisocial personality traits for general offending but were almost completely mediated by the more reactive measure of antisocial behavior.
dc.description.abstractADHD appears to be a potential risk factor for general offending in its own right irrespective of the presence of comorbidity, whereas mood instability is more important with regard to reactive behavior.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSAGE Publicationsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1087054711429791en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of attention disordersen
dc.subjectADHDen
dc.subjectAfbrotamennen
dc.subjectSkapgerðen
dc.subjectNemenduren
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAffecten
dc.subject.meshAttention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivityen
dc.subject.meshCriminalsen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMood Disordersen
dc.subject.meshSelf Reporten
dc.subject.meshStudentsen
dc.titleThe relationship between ADHD symptoms, mood instability, and self-reported offending.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentKings Coll London, Inst Psychiat, London SE5 8AF, England, Univ Iceland, Landspitali, Natl Univ Hosp Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland, Univ Iceland, Reykjavik, Icelanden
dc.identifier.journalJournal of attention disordersen
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren
html.description.abstractTo investigate the relative importance of ADHD symptoms, mood instability, and antisocial personality disorder traits in predicting self-reported offending.
html.description.abstractA total of 295 Icelandic students completed two scales of offending behavior and measures of ADHD symptoms, mood instability, and antisocial personality traits.
html.description.abstractSelf-reported offending from the two independent scales correlated significantly with ADHD symptoms, mood instability, and antisocial personality traits with medium to large effect size. Multiple regressions showed that ADHD symptoms contributed to the two outcome measures beyond that of age and gender with a medium effect size. The ADHD effects were only partly mediated by mood instability and antisocial personality traits for general offending but were almost completely mediated by the more reactive measure of antisocial behavior.
html.description.abstractADHD appears to be a potential risk factor for general offending in its own right irrespective of the presence of comorbidity, whereas mood instability is more important with regard to reactive behavior.


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