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dc.contributor.authorÓlafsdóttir, Inga Sif
dc.contributor.authorGíslason, Thórarinn
dc.contributor.authorGudnason, Vilmundur
dc.contributor.authorBenediktsdóttir, Bryndís
dc.contributor.authorÓlafsson, Ísleifur
dc.contributor.authorAspelund, Thor
dc.contributor.authorThjódleifsson, Bjarni
dc.contributor.authorJanson, Christer
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-24T11:56:16Z
dc.date.available2014-02-24T11:56:16Z
dc.date.issued2013-01
dc.date.submitted2013-02-24
dc.identifier.citationRespir Med 2013, 107(1):91-7en
dc.identifier.issn1532-3064
dc.identifier.pmid23083841
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.rmed.2012.09.020
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/313306
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field.en
dc.description.abstractSystemic inflammation is associated with impaired lung function. Studies, most cross-sectional, report a stronger association between systemic inflammation and lung function impairment in men than women. The aim was to evaluate gender differences in the longitudinal association between systemic inflammation and lung function. We used data from randomly chosen residents of Reykjavík, born 1940-54, who were investigated in three stages: Baseline (1973-75; 1983-85) and follow-up (2001-03). The participants (n = 1049, 574 women) had a mean age of 28 ± 6 years at baseline and mean follow-up time of 27 ± 4 years. At each stage lung function (FEV(1) and FVC) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were evaluated. Change in FEV(1) (p = 0.04) and FVC (p = 0.01) was associated with baseline CRP in men but not in women. In the multiple variable analysis, CRP at baseline was associated with a decline in FEV(1) (-3.1 mL/year, 95% CI: -5.1, -0.99) and FVC (-2.5 mL/year, 95% CI: -4.4, -0.65) in men but not in women. Similarly during follow-up, change in CRP, standardised to 1SD, was associated with a decline in FEV(1) (-0.19 mL/year, 95% CI: -0.30, -0.07) and FVC (-0.11 mL/year, 95% CI: -0.22, -0.01)) in men but not in women. This prospective study confirms a stronger association between systemic inflammation and lung function decline in men than in women. This may indicate a gender difference in the mechanisms of lung function decline.
dc.description.sponsorshipIcelandic Research Council 050405011 Landspitali-University Hospital Research Funden
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier Scienceen
dc.relation.urlhttp//:dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rmed.2012.09.020en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0954611112003617en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Respiratory medicineen
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAgingen
dc.subject.meshBiological Markersen
dc.subject.meshC-Reactive Proteinen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen
dc.subject.meshForced Expiratory Volumeen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshInflammationen
dc.subject.meshLungen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshPatient Dropoutsen
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen
dc.subject.meshSex Characteristicsen
dc.subject.meshSmokingen
dc.subject.meshVital Capacityen
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten
dc.titleCRP is associated with lung function decline in men but not women: a prospective study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUppsala Univ, Univ Hosp, Dept Med Sci, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden Landspitali Univ Hosp, Dept Allergy Resp Med & Sleep, IS-108 Reykjavik, Iceland Univ Iceland, Fac Med, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland Iceland Heart Assoc, IS-201 Kopavogur, Iceland Landspitali Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Biochem, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland Landspitali Univ Hosp, Dept Gastroenterol, IS-101 Reykjavik, Icelanden
dc.identifier.journalRespiratory medicineen
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren
html.description.abstractSystemic inflammation is associated with impaired lung function. Studies, most cross-sectional, report a stronger association between systemic inflammation and lung function impairment in men than women. The aim was to evaluate gender differences in the longitudinal association between systemic inflammation and lung function. We used data from randomly chosen residents of Reykjavík, born 1940-54, who were investigated in three stages: Baseline (1973-75; 1983-85) and follow-up (2001-03). The participants (n = 1049, 574 women) had a mean age of 28 ± 6 years at baseline and mean follow-up time of 27 ± 4 years. At each stage lung function (FEV(1) and FVC) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were evaluated. Change in FEV(1) (p = 0.04) and FVC (p = 0.01) was associated with baseline CRP in men but not in women. In the multiple variable analysis, CRP at baseline was associated with a decline in FEV(1) (-3.1 mL/year, 95% CI: -5.1, -0.99) and FVC (-2.5 mL/year, 95% CI: -4.4, -0.65) in men but not in women. Similarly during follow-up, change in CRP, standardised to 1SD, was associated with a decline in FEV(1) (-0.19 mL/year, 95% CI: -0.30, -0.07) and FVC (-0.11 mL/year, 95% CI: -0.22, -0.01)) in men but not in women. This prospective study confirms a stronger association between systemic inflammation and lung function decline in men than in women. This may indicate a gender difference in the mechanisms of lung function decline.


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