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dc.contributor.authorEmilsson, Ossur Ingi
dc.contributor.authorGíslason, Thornórarinn
dc.contributor.authorOlin, Anna-Carin
dc.contributor.authorJanson, Christer
dc.contributor.authorOlafsson, Isleifur
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-18T13:47:36Z
dc.date.available2014-03-18T13:47:36Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.date.submitted2013
dc.identifier.citationGastroenterol Res Pract 2013,:148086en
dc.identifier.issn1687-6121
dc.identifier.pmid23653634
dc.identifier.doi10.1155/2013/148086
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/314211
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article, please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field or click on the hyperlink at the top of the page marked Files. This article is open access.en
dc.description.abstractGastroesophageal reflux (GER) is commonly associated with respiratory symptoms, either through a vagal bronchoconstrictive reflex or through microaspiration of gastric contents. No diagnostic test is available, however, to diagnose when respiratory illnesses are caused by GER and when not, but research in this field has been moving forward. Various biomarkers in different types of biosamples have been studied in this context. The aim of this review is to summarize the present knowledge in this field. GER patients with respiratory diseases seem to have a different biochemical profile from similar patients without GER. Inflammatory biomarkers differ in asthmatics based on GER status, tachykinins are elevated in patients with GER-related cough, and bile acids are elevated in lung transplant patients with GER. However, studies on these biomarkers are often limited by their small size, methods of analysis, and case selections. The two pathogenesis mechanisms are associated with different respiratory illnesses and biochemical profiles. A reliable test to identify GER-induced respiratory disorders needs to be developed. Bronchoalveolar lavage is too invasive to be of use in most patients. Exhaled breath condensate samples need further evaluation and standardization. The newly developed particles in exhaled air measurements remain to be studied further.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherHindawi Publishing Corporationen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/148086en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3638692/en
dc.rightsopenAccessen
dc.subjectVélindabakflæðien
dc.subject.meshGastroesophageal Refluxen
dc.titleBiomarkers for gastroesophageal reflux in respiratory diseases.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Iceland, Fac Med, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland, Landspitali Univ Hosp, Dept Resp Med & Sleep, IS-108 Reykjavik, Iceland, Gothenburg Univ, Sahlgrenska Acad, S-41390 Gothenburg, Sweden, Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci Resp Med & Allergol, S-75312 Uppsala, Sweden, Landspitali Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Biochem, IS-108 Reykjavik, Icelanden
dc.identifier.journalGastroenterology research and practiceen
dc.rights.accessOpen Accessen
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-12T13:16:53Z
html.description.abstractGastroesophageal reflux (GER) is commonly associated with respiratory symptoms, either through a vagal bronchoconstrictive reflex or through microaspiration of gastric contents. No diagnostic test is available, however, to diagnose when respiratory illnesses are caused by GER and when not, but research in this field has been moving forward. Various biomarkers in different types of biosamples have been studied in this context. The aim of this review is to summarize the present knowledge in this field. GER patients with respiratory diseases seem to have a different biochemical profile from similar patients without GER. Inflammatory biomarkers differ in asthmatics based on GER status, tachykinins are elevated in patients with GER-related cough, and bile acids are elevated in lung transplant patients with GER. However, studies on these biomarkers are often limited by their small size, methods of analysis, and case selections. The two pathogenesis mechanisms are associated with different respiratory illnesses and biochemical profiles. A reliable test to identify GER-induced respiratory disorders needs to be developed. Bronchoalveolar lavage is too invasive to be of use in most patients. Exhaled breath condensate samples need further evaluation and standardization. The newly developed particles in exhaled air measurements remain to be studied further.


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