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dc.contributor.authorDavidsson, Steingrimur
dc.contributor.authorBlomqvist, Kirsti
dc.contributor.authorMolin, Lars
dc.contributor.authorMørk, Cato
dc.contributor.authorSigurgeirsson, Bardur
dc.contributor.authorZachariae, Hugh
dc.contributor.authorZachariae, Robert
dc.date.accessioned2008-07-10T11:46:36Z
dc.date.available2008-07-10T11:46:36Z
dc.date.issued2005-05-01
dc.date.submitted2008-07-10
dc.identifier.citationInt. J. Dermatol.. 2005, 44(5):378-83en
dc.identifier.issn0011-9059
dc.identifier.pmid15869535
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-4632.2005.01925.x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/31513
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractAIM: The Nordic Quality of Life Study was undertaken to assess the relationship between psoriasis and the quality of life in Nordic countries. The intention was also to determine whether there was a relationship between drinking, smoking, and the use of psychotherapeutic agents on the one hand, and psoriasis severity and quality of life on the other. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A questionnaire was mailed to 11,300 members of the Nordic Psoriasis Associations. Additional psoriasis patients were recruited by dermatologists (387) or admitted to dermatologic wards (385). These patients also underwent a physical examination, and their Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) was determined. The questionnaire included the Psoriasis Disability Index (PDI), Psoriasis Life Stress Inventory (PLSI), and additional questions on disease severity, treatment, and psoriasis arthritis. It also included questions regarding lifestyle issues, such as smoking, alcohol use, and the use of tranquilizers, antidepressants, and sleeping medications. RESULTS: The response rate for members was 50.2%. Included in the evaluation were 6497 patients. Men drank significantly more beer and liquor than women. The number of beers per day had a weak correlation with the PDI. Wine consumption, however, showed a weak, but significant, negative correlation with both PDI and PLSI. Patients admitted to dermatologic wards smoked more cigarettes and drank less wine than the other two groups. Significant differences were found between countries with regard to total alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking. The number of cigarettes and the use of tranquilizers, sleeping medications, and antidepressants showed small, but significant, positive correlations with psoriasis quality of life measures. CONCLUSIONS: Cigarette smoking and the use of tranquilizers, sleeping medications, and antidepressants are statistically correlated with impaired psoriasis-related quality of life.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherDecker Periodicalsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=16894284&site=ehost-liveen
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAlcohol Drinkingen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshFinlanden
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshLife Styleen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshPsoriasisen
dc.subject.meshPsychotropic Drugsen
dc.subject.meshQuality of Lifeen
dc.subject.meshScandinaviaen
dc.subject.meshSeverity of Illness Indexen
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen
dc.subject.meshSmokingen
dc.titleLifestyle of Nordic people with psoriasisen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Dermatology, University Hospital Reykjavik, 105 Reykjavik, Iceland. steingr@simnet.isen
dc.identifier.journalInternational journal of dermatologyen
html.description.abstractAIM: The Nordic Quality of Life Study was undertaken to assess the relationship between psoriasis and the quality of life in Nordic countries. The intention was also to determine whether there was a relationship between drinking, smoking, and the use of psychotherapeutic agents on the one hand, and psoriasis severity and quality of life on the other. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A questionnaire was mailed to 11,300 members of the Nordic Psoriasis Associations. Additional psoriasis patients were recruited by dermatologists (387) or admitted to dermatologic wards (385). These patients also underwent a physical examination, and their Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) was determined. The questionnaire included the Psoriasis Disability Index (PDI), Psoriasis Life Stress Inventory (PLSI), and additional questions on disease severity, treatment, and psoriasis arthritis. It also included questions regarding lifestyle issues, such as smoking, alcohol use, and the use of tranquilizers, antidepressants, and sleeping medications. RESULTS: The response rate for members was 50.2%. Included in the evaluation were 6497 patients. Men drank significantly more beer and liquor than women. The number of beers per day had a weak correlation with the PDI. Wine consumption, however, showed a weak, but significant, negative correlation with both PDI and PLSI. Patients admitted to dermatologic wards smoked more cigarettes and drank less wine than the other two groups. Significant differences were found between countries with regard to total alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking. The number of cigarettes and the use of tranquilizers, sleeping medications, and antidepressants showed small, but significant, positive correlations with psoriasis quality of life measures. CONCLUSIONS: Cigarette smoking and the use of tranquilizers, sleeping medications, and antidepressants are statistically correlated with impaired psoriasis-related quality of life.


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