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dc.contributor.authorHalldorsson, Jonas G
dc.contributor.authorArnkelsson, Gudmundur B
dc.contributor.authorTomasson, Kristinn
dc.contributor.authorFlekkoy, Kjell M
dc.contributor.authorMagnadottir, Hulda Bra
dc.contributor.authorArnarson, Eirikur Orn
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-16T13:33:11Z
dc.date.available2014-05-16T13:33:11Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.date.submitted2013
dc.identifier.citationBrain Inj. 2013, 27 (10):1106-18en
dc.identifier.issn1362-301X
dc.identifier.pmid23885641
dc.identifier.doi10.3109/02699052.2013.765599
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/317060
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field.en
dc.description.abstractTo assess long-term effects of early traumatic brain injury (TBI) on mental health, cognition, behaviour and adjustment and to identify prognostic factors.
dc.description.abstractA 1-year nationwide cohort of all 0-19 year old Icelandic children and adolescents diagnosed with TBI in 1992-1993 (n = 550) received a questionnaire with clinical outcome scales and questions on TBI and socio-economic status (SES) by mail ∼16 years post-injury. A control group (n = 1232), newly selected from the National Registry, received the same questionnaire. Non-respondents answered a shorter version by telephone. Overall participation was 67%.
dc.description.abstractMedically confirmed and self-reported TBI was reflected in worse outcome. Force of impact, number and severity of TBIs predicted poorer results. Parental SES and demographic factors had limited effects. Not reporting early, medically confirmed TBI did not exclude cognitive sequelae. In self-reported disability, absence of evaluation for compensation was not linked to outcome.
dc.description.abstractClinical outcome was consistent with late complaints attributed to early TBI. TBI-related variables had greater prognostic value than other factors. Self-reporting of TBI sustained very early in life needs supplementary information from parents and medical records. More consistency in compensation evaluations following paediatric TBI is indicated.
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Iceland Doctoral Fund Landspitali University Hospital Science Fund Margret Bjorgolfsdottir Memorial Fund Olafia Jonsdottir Memorial Fund Helga Jonsdotti Sigurlidi Kristjansson Memorial Fund Alcan Iceland Community Funden
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInforma Healthcareen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.3109/02699052.2013.765599en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Brain injury : [BI]en
dc.subjectHeilaskaðien
dc.subjectBörnen
dc.subject.meshAdaptation, Psychologicalen
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAge Distributionen
dc.subject.meshAnalysis of Varianceen
dc.subject.meshBrain Injuriesen
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen
dc.subject.meshCognition Disordersen
dc.subject.meshDisabled Personsen
dc.subject.meshEarly Diagnosisen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshInfanten
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen
dc.subject.meshLongitudinal Studiesen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMental Disordersen
dc.subject.meshMental Healthen
dc.subject.meshParentsen
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen
dc.subject.meshSelf Reporten
dc.subject.meshSeverity of Illness Indexen
dc.subject.meshSex Distributionen
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten
dc.titleLong-term outcome of medically confirmed and self-reported early traumatic brain injury in two nationwide samples.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland, Landspitali Univ Hosp, Psychol Serv, IS-108 Reykjavik, Iceland, Univ Iceland, Dept Psychol, Reykjavik, Iceland, Adm Occupat Safety & Hlth, Reykjavik, Iceland, Univ Oslo, Oslo, Norway, Upper Valley Neurol & Neurosurg, Lebanon, NH USAen
dc.identifier.journalBrain injury : [BI]en
dc.rights.accessClosed - Lokaðen
html.description.abstractTo assess long-term effects of early traumatic brain injury (TBI) on mental health, cognition, behaviour and adjustment and to identify prognostic factors.
html.description.abstractA 1-year nationwide cohort of all 0-19 year old Icelandic children and adolescents diagnosed with TBI in 1992-1993 (n = 550) received a questionnaire with clinical outcome scales and questions on TBI and socio-economic status (SES) by mail ∼16 years post-injury. A control group (n = 1232), newly selected from the National Registry, received the same questionnaire. Non-respondents answered a shorter version by telephone. Overall participation was 67%.
html.description.abstractMedically confirmed and self-reported TBI was reflected in worse outcome. Force of impact, number and severity of TBIs predicted poorer results. Parental SES and demographic factors had limited effects. Not reporting early, medically confirmed TBI did not exclude cognitive sequelae. In self-reported disability, absence of evaluation for compensation was not linked to outcome.
html.description.abstractClinical outcome was consistent with late complaints attributed to early TBI. TBI-related variables had greater prognostic value than other factors. Self-reporting of TBI sustained very early in life needs supplementary information from parents and medical records. More consistency in compensation evaluations following paediatric TBI is indicated.


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