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dc.contributor.authorSigurdardottir, S L
dc.contributor.authorThorleifsdottir, R H
dc.contributor.authorValdimarsson, H
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, A
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-19T14:15:20Z
dc.date.available2014-05-19T14:15:20Z
dc.date.issued2013-02
dc.date.submitted2014-05-19
dc.identifier.citationBr. J. Dermatol. 2013, 168(2):237-42en
dc.identifier.issn1365-2133
dc.identifier.pmid22901242
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2133.2012.11215.x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/317142
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field.en
dc.description.abstractPsoriasis is a common chronic skin disease with strong genetic associations and environmental triggers. Patients with psoriasis develop sore throats much more frequently than nonpsoriatic individuals and it is well documented that streptococcal throat infections can trigger the onset of psoriasis, and such infections cause exacerbation of chronic psoriasis. It is now generally accepted that psoriatic lesions are caused by abnormal reactivity of specific T lymphocytes in the skin. However, it has been shown in recent years that activation of specific immunity is always preceded by activation of nonspecific innate immune mechanisms, and that abnormalities in the innate immune system can cause dysregulation in specific immune responses. Here we explore the possible immune mechanisms that are involved in the link between infection of the tonsils and this inflammatory skin disease. Moreover, we survey the literature and discuss the suitability of tonsillectomy as a treatment for psoriasis.
dc.description.sponsorshipBabcock Endowment National Psoriasis Foundation U.S.A. American Skin Association Icelandic Research Fund Landspitali Hospital Research Fund University of Iceland for Doctoral Studiesen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2133.2012.11215.xen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The British journal of dermatologyen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshImmunity, Innateen
dc.subject.meshPalatine Tonsilen
dc.subject.meshPsoriasisen
dc.subject.meshStreptococcal Infectionsen
dc.subject.meshStreptococcus pyogenesen
dc.subject.meshTonsillectomyen
dc.subject.meshTonsillitisen
dc.titleThe role of the palatine tonsils in the pathogenesis and treatment of psoriasis.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentLandspitali Univ Hosp, Dept Immunol, Reykjavik, Iceland Univ Michigan, Dept Dermatol, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USAen
dc.identifier.journalBritish journal of dermatologyen
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren
html.description.abstractPsoriasis is a common chronic skin disease with strong genetic associations and environmental triggers. Patients with psoriasis develop sore throats much more frequently than nonpsoriatic individuals and it is well documented that streptococcal throat infections can trigger the onset of psoriasis, and such infections cause exacerbation of chronic psoriasis. It is now generally accepted that psoriatic lesions are caused by abnormal reactivity of specific T lymphocytes in the skin. However, it has been shown in recent years that activation of specific immunity is always preceded by activation of nonspecific innate immune mechanisms, and that abnormalities in the innate immune system can cause dysregulation in specific immune responses. Here we explore the possible immune mechanisms that are involved in the link between infection of the tonsils and this inflammatory skin disease. Moreover, we survey the literature and discuss the suitability of tonsillectomy as a treatment for psoriasis.


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