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dc.contributor.authorThorisdottir, Asa V
dc.contributor.authorRamel, Alfons
dc.contributor.authorPalsson, Gestur I
dc.contributor.authorTomassson, Helgi
dc.contributor.authorThorsdottir, Inga
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-23T08:55:30Z
dc.date.available2014-05-23T08:55:30Z
dc.date.issued2013-09
dc.identifier.citationEur J Nutr 2013, 52(6):1661-8en
dc.identifier.issn1436-6215
dc.identifier.pmid23212531
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00394-012-0472-8
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/317341
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field.en
dc.description.abstractStudies on iron status in infancy and early childhood have shown contradicting results concerning prolonged breast-feeding and cow's milk intake. The aim of the present study was to investigate associations between iron status among one-year-olds and feeding, with focus on the type of milk.
dc.description.abstractRandomly selected healthy infants were prospectively investigated until 1 year of age in two cohorts born 1995-1996 (n = 114) and 2005 (n = 140). Information on birth data, feeding and growth until 12 months and iron status at 12 months was collected. Data from the two cohorts were pooled and the infants categorized into three groups according to their predominant milk consumption at 9 months of age, that is, breast milk, cow's milk or follow-on formula.
dc.description.abstractThe prevalence of iron deficiency was highest in the cow's milk group and lowest in the follow-on formula group. According to a linear model, adjusted for gender, birth weight and exclusive breast-feeding duration, cow's milk consumption was negatively associated with serum ferritin (SF) and formula positively, but breast milk not. Predicted SF (μg/l) = 11.652(intercept) - 5.362(boy) + 0.005 × birth weight (g) + 2.826(exclusively breastfed ≥ 4 months) + 0.027 × formula (ml) - 0.022 × cow's milk (ml) + 0.005 × breast milk (ml). Correction for other dietary factors did not change these results.
dc.description.abstractIn this pooled analysis, cow's milk intake in late infancy associated negatively, and follow-on formula positively, with iron status. Prolonged partial breast-feeding does not seem to be of importance for iron status. Fortified food seems to improve iron status in late infancy.
dc.description.sponsorshipIcelandic Research Council 050424031 Icelandic Research Fund for Graduate Students, University of Iceland Research Fund 080740008 Landspitali-University Hospital Research funden
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringer Internationalen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00394-012-0472-8en
dc.relation.urlhttp://download.springer.com/static/pdf/910/art%253A10.1007%252Fs00394-012-0472-8.pdf?auth66=1401007975_e4b11ea5f24ab7cf7805e99bb2ae8cb6&ext=.pdfen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to European journal of nutritionen
dc.subject.meshAnemia, Iron-Deficiencyen
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen
dc.subject.meshCattleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshInfanten
dc.subject.meshInfant Formulaen
dc.subject.meshIron, Dietaryen
dc.subject.meshMilken
dc.subject.meshMilk, Humanen
dc.subject.meshNutrition Assessmenten
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen
dc.titleIron status of one-year-olds and association with breast milk, cow's milk or formula in late infancy.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Iceland, Sch Hlth Sci, Fac Food Sci & Nutr, Unit Nutr Res, Reykjavik, Iceland Natl Univ Hosp Iceland, Landspitali, Reykjavik, Iceland Natl Univ Hosp Iceland, Childrens Hosp, Landspitali, Reykjavik, Iceland Univ Iceland, Fac Econ & Business Adm, Reykjavik, Icelanden
dc.identifier.journalEuropean journal of nutritionen
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren
html.description.abstractStudies on iron status in infancy and early childhood have shown contradicting results concerning prolonged breast-feeding and cow's milk intake. The aim of the present study was to investigate associations between iron status among one-year-olds and feeding, with focus on the type of milk.
html.description.abstractRandomly selected healthy infants were prospectively investigated until 1 year of age in two cohorts born 1995-1996 (n = 114) and 2005 (n = 140). Information on birth data, feeding and growth until 12 months and iron status at 12 months was collected. Data from the two cohorts were pooled and the infants categorized into three groups according to their predominant milk consumption at 9 months of age, that is, breast milk, cow's milk or follow-on formula.
html.description.abstractThe prevalence of iron deficiency was highest in the cow's milk group and lowest in the follow-on formula group. According to a linear model, adjusted for gender, birth weight and exclusive breast-feeding duration, cow's milk consumption was negatively associated with serum ferritin (SF) and formula positively, but breast milk not. Predicted SF (μg/l) = 11.652(intercept) - 5.362(boy) + 0.005 × birth weight (g) + 2.826(exclusively breastfed ≥ 4 months) + 0.027 × formula (ml) - 0.022 × cow's milk (ml) + 0.005 × breast milk (ml). Correction for other dietary factors did not change these results.
html.description.abstractIn this pooled analysis, cow's milk intake in late infancy associated negatively, and follow-on formula positively, with iron status. Prolonged partial breast-feeding does not seem to be of importance for iron status. Fortified food seems to improve iron status in late infancy.


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