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dc.contributor.authorLieder, Ramona
dc.contributor.authorPetersen, Pétur Henry
dc.contributor.authorSigurjónsson, Ólafur Eysteinn
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-27T13:53:51Z
dc.date.available2014-05-27T13:53:51Z
dc.date.issued2013-10
dc.date.submitted2014-05-26
dc.identifier.citationTissue Eng Part B Rev 2013, 19(5):391-402en
dc.identifier.issn1937-3376
dc.identifier.pmid23350734
dc.identifier.doi10.1089/ten.TEB.2012.0636
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/317477
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field.en
dc.description.abstractMetal implants and polymeric devices for the application in the clinical treatment of orthopedic tissue injuries are increasingly coated with bioactive biomaterials derived from natural substances to induce desirable biological effects. Many metals and polymers used in biomaterials research show high affinity for endotoxins, which are abundant in the environment. Endotoxin contamination is indicated in the pathology of periodontitis and aseptic implant loosening, but may also affect the evaluation of a biomaterial's bioactivity by inducing strong inflammatory reactions. In this review, we discuss the high affinity of three commonly used implant biomaterials for endotoxins and how the contamination can affect the outcome of the orthopedic fixation. The chemical nature of bacterial endotoxins and some of the clinical health implications are described, as this knowledge is critically important to tackle the issues associated with the measurement and removal of endotoxins from medical devices. Commonly used methods for endotoxin testing and removal from natural substances are examined and the lack of standard guidelines for the in vitro evaluation of biomaterials is discussed.
dc.description.sponsorshipTechnology Development Fund Icelandic Research Fund Landspitali University Hospitalen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMary Ann Lieberten
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ten.TEB.2012.0636en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Tissue engineering. Part B, Reviewsen
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen
dc.subject.meshBiocompatible Materialsen
dc.subject.meshBiofoulingen
dc.subject.meshDental Prosthesisen
dc.subject.meshEndotoxinsen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshPeriodontitisen
dc.titleEndotoxins-the invisible companion in biomaterials research.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentLandspitali Univ Hosp, Blood Bank, IS-105 Reykjavik, Iceland Reykjavik Univ, Sch Sci & Engn, Reykjavik, Iceland Univ Iceland, Biomed Ctr, Reykjavik, Iceland Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Icelanden
dc.identifier.journalTissue engineering. Part B, Reviewsen
dc.rights.accessClosed - Lokaðen
html.description.abstractMetal implants and polymeric devices for the application in the clinical treatment of orthopedic tissue injuries are increasingly coated with bioactive biomaterials derived from natural substances to induce desirable biological effects. Many metals and polymers used in biomaterials research show high affinity for endotoxins, which are abundant in the environment. Endotoxin contamination is indicated in the pathology of periodontitis and aseptic implant loosening, but may also affect the evaluation of a biomaterial's bioactivity by inducing strong inflammatory reactions. In this review, we discuss the high affinity of three commonly used implant biomaterials for endotoxins and how the contamination can affect the outcome of the orthopedic fixation. The chemical nature of bacterial endotoxins and some of the clinical health implications are described, as this knowledge is critically important to tackle the issues associated with the measurement and removal of endotoxins from medical devices. Commonly used methods for endotoxin testing and removal from natural substances are examined and the lack of standard guidelines for the in vitro evaluation of biomaterials is discussed.


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