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dc.contributor.authorHusum, B
dc.contributor.authorStenqvist, O
dc.contributor.authorAlahuhta, S
dc.contributor.authorSigurdsson, G H
dc.contributor.authorDale, O
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-04T10:42:13Z
dc.date.available2014-07-04T10:42:13Z
dc.date.issued2013-10
dc.date.submitted2014
dc.identifier.citationActa Anaesthesiol Scand 2013, 57 (9):1131-7en
dc.identifier.issn1399-6576
dc.identifier.pmid23889322
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/aas.12165
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/322429
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink at the bottom of the pageen
dc.description.abstractThe use of nitrous oxide in modern anaesthesia has been questioned. We surveyed changes in use of nitrous oxide in Scandinavia and its justifications during the last two decades.
dc.description.abstractAll 191 departments of anaesthesia in the Scandinavian countries were requested by email to answer an electronic survey in SurveyMonkey.
dc.description.abstractOne hundred and twenty-five (64%) of the departments responded; four were excluded. The 121 departments provided 807.520 general anaesthetics annually. The usage of nitrous oxide was reported in 11.9% of cases, ranging from 0.6% in Denmark to 38.6% in Iceland while volatile anaesthetics were employed in 48.9%, lowest in Denmark (22.6%) and highest in Iceland (91.9%). Nitrous oxide was co-administered with volatile anaesthetics in 21.5% of general anaesthetics [2.4% (Denmark) -34.5% (Iceland)]. Use of nitrous oxide was unchanged in five departments (4%), decreasing in 75 (62%) and stopped in 41 (34%). Reasons for decreasing or stopping use of nitrous oxide were fairly uniform in the five countries, the most important being that other agents were 'better', whereas few put weight on its potential risk for increasing morbidity. Decision to stop using nitrous oxide was made by the departments except in four cases. Of 87 maternity wards, nitrous oxide was used in 72, whereas this was the case in 42 of 111 day-surgery units.
dc.description.abstractThe use of nitrous oxide has decreased in the Scandinavian countries, apparently because many now prefer other agents. Difference in practices between the five countries were unexpected and apparently not justified on anticipated evidence only.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/aas.12165en
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/aas.12165/pdfen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Acta anaesthesiologica Scandinavicaen
dc.subjectSvæfingaren
dc.subjectLyfjanotkunen
dc.subjectFæðingen
dc.subject.meshAmbulatory Surgical Proceduresen
dc.subject.meshAnesthesia, Inhalationen
dc.subject.meshAnesthetics, Inhalationen
dc.subject.meshDelivery, Obstetricen
dc.subject.meshDrug Utilizationen
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Pollutionen
dc.subject.meshHealth Care Surveysen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshNitrous Oxideen
dc.subject.meshPostoperative Nausea and Vomitingen
dc.subject.meshScandinaviaen
dc.titleCurrent use of nitrous oxide in public hospitals in Scandinavian countries.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHillerod Hosp, Dept Anaesthesiol, DK-3400 Hillerod, Denmark, Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Anaesthesiol & Intens Care, Gothenburg, Sweden, Oulu Univ Hosp, Dept Anaesthesiol, Oulu, Finland, Univ Iceland, Landspitali Univ Hosp, Dept Anaesthesia & Intens Care Med, Reykjavik, Iceland, Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Cirkulat & Med Imaging, N-7034 Trondheim, Norwayen
dc.identifier.journalActa anaesthesiologica Scandinavicaen
dc.rights.accessLandspitali Access - LSH-aðganguren
html.description.abstractThe use of nitrous oxide in modern anaesthesia has been questioned. We surveyed changes in use of nitrous oxide in Scandinavia and its justifications during the last two decades.
html.description.abstractAll 191 departments of anaesthesia in the Scandinavian countries were requested by email to answer an electronic survey in SurveyMonkey.
html.description.abstractOne hundred and twenty-five (64%) of the departments responded; four were excluded. The 121 departments provided 807.520 general anaesthetics annually. The usage of nitrous oxide was reported in 11.9% of cases, ranging from 0.6% in Denmark to 38.6% in Iceland while volatile anaesthetics were employed in 48.9%, lowest in Denmark (22.6%) and highest in Iceland (91.9%). Nitrous oxide was co-administered with volatile anaesthetics in 21.5% of general anaesthetics [2.4% (Denmark) -34.5% (Iceland)]. Use of nitrous oxide was unchanged in five departments (4%), decreasing in 75 (62%) and stopped in 41 (34%). Reasons for decreasing or stopping use of nitrous oxide were fairly uniform in the five countries, the most important being that other agents were 'better', whereas few put weight on its potential risk for increasing morbidity. Decision to stop using nitrous oxide was made by the departments except in four cases. Of 87 maternity wards, nitrous oxide was used in 72, whereas this was the case in 42 of 111 day-surgery units.
html.description.abstractThe use of nitrous oxide has decreased in the Scandinavian countries, apparently because many now prefer other agents. Difference in practices between the five countries were unexpected and apparently not justified on anticipated evidence only.


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