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dc.contributor.authorSveinbjarnardottir, Eydis Kristin
dc.contributor.authorSvavarsdottir, Erla Kolbrun
dc.contributor.authorWright, Lorraine M
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-07T11:18:44Z
dc.date.available2014-08-07T11:18:44Z
dc.date.issued2013-05
dc.date.submitted2013
dc.identifier.citationInt J Nurs Stud 2013, 50 (5):593-602en
dc.identifier.issn1873-491X
dc.identifier.pmid23146277
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2012.10.009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/324342
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink at the bottom of the pageen
dc.description.abstractPsychiatric illness of a family member can have a serious impact on the entire family. In addition, these families are faced with psychological burdens and stigmas. Little is known about the effectiveness of family nursing interventions on patients and their families when a family member is admitted for psychiatric treatment. Few studies have been published where family nursing interventions are integrated into routine inpatient services.
dc.description.abstractTo evaluate the effectiveness of implementing a therapeutic conversation intervention in acute inpatient psychiatry with families, by evaluating family perceived support, expressive family function and general well-being.
dc.description.abstractA controlled before and after study design was used. Patients and family members at four acute psychiatric units at a university hospital were selected for the implementation of family systems nursing (FSN). The nurses on one acute psychiatric unit were educated, trained, and supervised in a therapeutic conversation intervention built on the Calgary Family Assessment and Interventions models (Wright and Leahey, 2009). In the intervention group, 68 patients and 68 family members (N=136), received two-to-five therapeutic conversations with a nurse. The control groups were from three other acute units at the hospital, where 74 patients and 74 family members (N=148) received family nursing care as usual.
dc.description.abstractThe main findings indicated that family members who received the short therapeutic conversation intervention were found to perceive significant higher cognitive and emotional support from the nurses than family members who received standard care.
dc.description.abstractThe benefits of a specific short-term therapeutic conversation intervention are evident and valuable for nurses working in acute psychiatry. These positive results for families of psychiatric patients should not only encourage and propel clinical educators, clinical nurses and nurse researchers and other health professionals to develop and implement the therapeutic conversation intervention in acute psychiatric services but also be part of ritualized protocols of practice.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2012.10.009en
dc.relation.urlhttp://ac.els-cdn.com/S0020748912003537/1-s2.0-S0020748912003537-main.pdf?_tid=ba06982a-1e23-11e4-807d-00000aab0f02&acdnat=1407410132_89bf1b541da8e0b1e2f43641b30ad599en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to International journal of nursing studiesen
dc.subjectGeðsjúkdómaren
dc.subjectFjölskyldumeðferðen
dc.subjectHeilbrigðisþjónustaen
dc.subjectGeðsjúkrahúsen
dc.subject.meshAcute Diseaseen
dc.subject.meshFamilyen
dc.subject.meshFamily Therapyen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMental Disordersen
dc.subject.meshMental Health Servicesen
dc.titleWhat are the benefits of a short therapeutic conversation intervention with acute psychiatric patients and their families? A controlled before and after study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Iceland, Eirberg, Eiriksgata 34, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canadaen
dc.identifier.journalInternational journal of nursing studiesen
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren
html.description.abstractPsychiatric illness of a family member can have a serious impact on the entire family. In addition, these families are faced with psychological burdens and stigmas. Little is known about the effectiveness of family nursing interventions on patients and their families when a family member is admitted for psychiatric treatment. Few studies have been published where family nursing interventions are integrated into routine inpatient services.
html.description.abstractTo evaluate the effectiveness of implementing a therapeutic conversation intervention in acute inpatient psychiatry with families, by evaluating family perceived support, expressive family function and general well-being.
html.description.abstractA controlled before and after study design was used. Patients and family members at four acute psychiatric units at a university hospital were selected for the implementation of family systems nursing (FSN). The nurses on one acute psychiatric unit were educated, trained, and supervised in a therapeutic conversation intervention built on the Calgary Family Assessment and Interventions models (Wright and Leahey, 2009). In the intervention group, 68 patients and 68 family members (N=136), received two-to-five therapeutic conversations with a nurse. The control groups were from three other acute units at the hospital, where 74 patients and 74 family members (N=148) received family nursing care as usual.
html.description.abstractThe main findings indicated that family members who received the short therapeutic conversation intervention were found to perceive significant higher cognitive and emotional support from the nurses than family members who received standard care.
html.description.abstractThe benefits of a specific short-term therapeutic conversation intervention are evident and valuable for nurses working in acute psychiatry. These positive results for families of psychiatric patients should not only encourage and propel clinical educators, clinical nurses and nurse researchers and other health professionals to develop and implement the therapeutic conversation intervention in acute psychiatric services but also be part of ritualized protocols of practice.


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