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dc.contributor.authorStefansdottir, Hrafnhildur
dc.contributor.authorArnar, David O
dc.contributor.authorAspelund, Thor
dc.contributor.authorSigurdsson, Sigurdur
dc.contributor.authorJonsdottir, Maria K
dc.contributor.authorHjaltason, Haukur
dc.contributor.authorLauner, Lenore J
dc.contributor.authorGudnason, Vilmundur
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-08T14:15:18Z
dc.date.available2014-08-08T14:15:18Z
dc.date.issued2013-04
dc.date.submitted2013
dc.identifier.citationStroke 2013, 44 (4):1020-5en
dc.identifier.issn1524-4628
dc.identifier.pmid23444303
dc.identifier.doi10.1161/STROKEAHA.12.679381
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/324518
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article, please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field or click on the hyperlink at the top of the page marked Files. This article is open access.en
dc.description.abstractAtrial fibrillation (AF) has been associated with cognitive decline independent of stroke, suggesting additional effects of AF on the brain. We aimed to assess the association between AF and brain function and structure in a general elderly population.
dc.description.abstractThis is a cross-sectional analysis of 4251 nondemented participants (mean age, 76 ± 5 years) in the population-based Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study. Medical record data were collected for the presence, subtype, and time from first diagnosis of AF; 330 participants had AF. Brain volume measurements, adjusted for intracranial volume, and presence of cerebral infarcts were determined with magnetic resonance imaging. Memory, speed of processing, and executive function composites were calculated from a cognitive test battery. In a multivariable linear regression model, adjustments were made for demographic factors, cardiovascular risk factors, and cerebral infarcts.
dc.description.abstractParticipants with AF had lower total brain volume compared with those without AF (P<0.001). The association was stronger with persistent/permanent than paroxysmal AF and with increased time from the first diagnosis of the disease. Of the brain tissue volumes, AF was associated with lower volume of gray and white matter hyperintensities (P<0.001 and P = 0.008, respectively), but not of white matter hyperintensities (P = 0.49). Participants with AF scored lower on tests of memory.
dc.description.abstractAF is associated with smaller brain volume, and the association is stronger with increasing burden of the arrhythmia. These findings suggest that AF has a cumulative negative effect on the brain independent of cerebral infarcts.
dc.description.sponsorshipLandspitali National University Hospital of Iceland Science Fund Helga Jonsdottir and Sigvaldi Kristjansson Memorial Fund National Institutes of Health/N01-AG-1-2100 National Institute on Aging Intramural Research Program Icelandic Heart Association Althingi (the Icelandic Parliament)en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkinsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1161/STROKEAHA.12.679381en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3632359/en
dc.rightsopenAccessen
dc.subjectGáttatifen
dc.subjectHeilablóðfallen
dc.subjectMinnien
dc.subjectHeilabilunen
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen
dc.subject.meshAtrial Fibrillationen
dc.subject.meshBrainen
dc.subject.meshCerebral Infarctionen
dc.subject.meshCognitionen
dc.subject.meshCognition Disordersen
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshGenetic Predisposition to Diseaseen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imagingen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshOutcome Assessment (Health Care)en
dc.subject.meshRegression Analysisen
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen
dc.titleAtrial fibrillation is associated with reduced brain volume and cognitive function independent of cerebral infarcts.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland, Landspitali Natl Univ Hosp Iceland, Dept Med, Cardiovasc Res Ctr, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland, Iceland Heart Assoc, Kopavogur, Iceland, Univ Iceland, Fac Psychol, Reykjavik, Iceland, Landspitali Natl Univ Hosp Iceland, Dept Neurol, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland, NIA, Lab Epidemiol Demog & Biometry, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA, Univ Iowa Hosp & Clin, Dept Internal Med, Iowa City, IA 52242 USAen
dc.identifier.journalStroke; a journal of cerebral circulationen
dc.rights.accessOpen Accessen
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-12T13:29:10Z
html.description.abstractAtrial fibrillation (AF) has been associated with cognitive decline independent of stroke, suggesting additional effects of AF on the brain. We aimed to assess the association between AF and brain function and structure in a general elderly population.
html.description.abstractThis is a cross-sectional analysis of 4251 nondemented participants (mean age, 76 ± 5 years) in the population-based Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study. Medical record data were collected for the presence, subtype, and time from first diagnosis of AF; 330 participants had AF. Brain volume measurements, adjusted for intracranial volume, and presence of cerebral infarcts were determined with magnetic resonance imaging. Memory, speed of processing, and executive function composites were calculated from a cognitive test battery. In a multivariable linear regression model, adjustments were made for demographic factors, cardiovascular risk factors, and cerebral infarcts.
html.description.abstractParticipants with AF had lower total brain volume compared with those without AF (P<0.001). The association was stronger with persistent/permanent than paroxysmal AF and with increased time from the first diagnosis of the disease. Of the brain tissue volumes, AF was associated with lower volume of gray and white matter hyperintensities (P<0.001 and P = 0.008, respectively), but not of white matter hyperintensities (P = 0.49). Participants with AF scored lower on tests of memory.
html.description.abstractAF is associated with smaller brain volume, and the association is stronger with increasing burden of the arrhythmia. These findings suggest that AF has a cumulative negative effect on the brain independent of cerebral infarcts.


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