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dc.contributor.authorTorfadottir, Johanna E
dc.contributor.authorValdimarsdottir, Unnur A
dc.contributor.authorMucci, Lorelei A
dc.contributor.authorKasperzyk, Julie L
dc.contributor.authorFall, Katja
dc.contributor.authorTryggvadottir, Laufey
dc.contributor.authorAspelund, Thor
dc.contributor.authorOlafsson, Orn
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Tamara B
dc.contributor.authorJonsson, Eirikur
dc.contributor.authorTulinius, Hrafn
dc.contributor.authorGudnason, Vilmundur
dc.contributor.authorAdami, Hans-Olov
dc.contributor.authorStampfer, Meir
dc.contributor.authorSteingrimsdottir, Laufey
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-11T14:09:37Z
dc.date.available2014-08-11T14:09:37Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.date.submitted2013
dc.identifier.citationPLoS ONE 2013, 8 (4):e59799en
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.pmid23613715
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0059799
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/324655
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article, please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field or click on the hyperlink at the top of the page marked Files. This article is open access.en
dc.description.abstractTo examine whether fish and fish oil consumption across the lifespan is associated with a lower risk of prostate cancer.
dc.description.abstractThe study was nested among 2268 men aged 67-96 years in the AGES-Reykjavik cohort study. In 2002 to 2006, dietary habits were assessed, for early life, midlife and later life using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Participants were followed for prostate cancer diagnosis and mortality through 2009 via linkage to nationwide cancer- and mortality registers. Adjusting for potential confounders, we used regression models to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and hazard ratios (HRs) for prostate cancer according to fish and fish oil consumption.
dc.description.abstractAmong the 2268 men, we ascertained 214 prevalent and 133 incident prostate cancer cases, of which 63 had advanced disease. High fish consumption in early- and midlife was not associated with overall or advanced prostate cancer. High intake of salted or smoked fish was associated with a 2-fold increased risk of advanced prostate cancer both in early life (95% CI: 1.08, 3.62) and in later life (95% CI: 1.04, 5.00). Men consuming fish oil in later life had a lower risk of advanced prostate cancer [HR (95%CI): 0.43 (0.19, 0.95)], no association was found for early life or midlife consumption.
dc.description.abstractSalted or smoked fish may increase risk of advanced prostate cancer, whereas fish oil consumption may be protective against progression of prostate cancer in elderly men. In a setting with very high fish consumption, no association was found between overall fish consumption in early or midlife and prostate cancer risk.
dc.description.sponsorshipFramfor (Progress) Icelandic organization Nordic Health Whole Grain Food NIH 5 T32 CA09001-36 American Institute for Cancer Research National Institute on Aging N01-AG-1-2100 Intramural Research Program of the National Institute on Aging, the Icelandic Heart Association Althingi (the Icelandic Parliament)en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPublic Library Scienceen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0059799en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3629172/en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to PloS oneen
dc.subjectLýsien
dc.subjectFæðubótarefnien
dc.subjectMataræðien
dc.subjectAldraðiren
dc.subjectSjávarafurðiren
dc.subjectBlöðruhálskirtilskrabbameinen
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen
dc.subject.meshAgingen
dc.subject.meshFeeding Behavioren
dc.subject.meshFish Oilsen
dc.subject.meshFish Productsen
dc.subject.meshFood Habitsen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshProstatic Neoplasmsen
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen
dc.titleConsumption of fish products across the lifespan and prostate cancer risk.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Iceland, Ctr Publ Hlth Sci, Reykjavik, Iceland, Univ Iceland, Sch Educ, Educ Res Inst, Reykjavik, Iceland, Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA 02115 USA, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Med, Channing Div Network Med, Boston, MA 02115 USA, Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Boston, MA USA, Orebro Univ Hosp, Orebro, Sweden, Iceland Canc Registry, Reykjavik, Iceland, NIA, Lab Epidemiol Demog & Biometry, Intramural Res Program, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA, Landspitali Natl Univ Hosp Iceland, Dept Urol, Reykjavik, Iceland, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden, Iceland Heart Assoc, Kopavogur, Iceland, Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland, Univ Iceland, Landspitali Univ Hosp, Unit Nutr Res, Reykjavik, Iceland, Univ Iceland, Sch Hlth Sci, Fac Food Sci & Nutr, Reykjavik, Icelanden
dc.identifier.journalPloS oneen
dc.rights.accessOpen Access - Opinn aðganguren
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-12T13:29:32Z
html.description.abstractTo examine whether fish and fish oil consumption across the lifespan is associated with a lower risk of prostate cancer.
html.description.abstractThe study was nested among 2268 men aged 67-96 years in the AGES-Reykjavik cohort study. In 2002 to 2006, dietary habits were assessed, for early life, midlife and later life using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Participants were followed for prostate cancer diagnosis and mortality through 2009 via linkage to nationwide cancer- and mortality registers. Adjusting for potential confounders, we used regression models to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and hazard ratios (HRs) for prostate cancer according to fish and fish oil consumption.
html.description.abstractAmong the 2268 men, we ascertained 214 prevalent and 133 incident prostate cancer cases, of which 63 had advanced disease. High fish consumption in early- and midlife was not associated with overall or advanced prostate cancer. High intake of salted or smoked fish was associated with a 2-fold increased risk of advanced prostate cancer both in early life (95% CI: 1.08, 3.62) and in later life (95% CI: 1.04, 5.00). Men consuming fish oil in later life had a lower risk of advanced prostate cancer [HR (95%CI): 0.43 (0.19, 0.95)], no association was found for early life or midlife consumption.
html.description.abstractSalted or smoked fish may increase risk of advanced prostate cancer, whereas fish oil consumption may be protective against progression of prostate cancer in elderly men. In a setting with very high fish consumption, no association was found between overall fish consumption in early or midlife and prostate cancer risk.


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