Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCranston, Mark
dc.contributor.authorSemple, Colin
dc.contributor.authorDuckitt, Roger
dc.contributor.authorVardi, Moshe
dc.contributor.authorLindgren, Stefan
dc.contributor.authorDavidson, Christopher
dc.contributor.authorPalsson, Runolfur
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-13T11:48:33Z
dc.date.available2014-08-13T11:48:33Z
dc.date.issued2013-10
dc.date.submitted2013
dc.identifier.citationEur. J. Intern. Med. 2013, 24 (7):627-32en
dc.identifier.issn1879-0828
dc.identifier.pmid24028929
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ejim.2013.08.005
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/324742
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article, please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field or click on the hyperlink at the top of the page marked Files. This article is open access.en
dc.description.abstractCurrent information on the role of internists in the European countries is scarce. This report describes the results of a survey of the practice of internists in Europe.
dc.description.abstractTwo online questionnaire-based surveys were carried out by the European Board of Internal Medicine, one on the practice of internists and the other on postgraduate training in internal medicine. The national internal medicine societies of all 30 member countries of the European Federation of Internal Medicine were invited to participate. The responses were reviewed by internal medicine trainees from the respective countries and summaries of the data were sent to the national societies for approval. Descriptive analysis of the data on the practice of internists was carried out.
dc.description.abstractTwenty-seven countries (90%) completed the questionnaire and approved their datasets. In 8 European countries, most internists practised internal medicine alone and in 7 countries at least half of physicians practised internal medicine together with a subspecialty. Internal medicine was considered a hospital-based specialty in most countries. The majority of selected presenting problems and diagnoses were rated as commonly encountered in all countries. More variability between countries was observed in the performance of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures.
dc.description.abstractMany similarities exist in the practice of internal medicine between the European countries, while some differences are present that likely reflect the variable impact of subspecialisation. The results of the survey should prove valuable for the definition of specific competencies and development of a common curriculum for internal medicine at the European level.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier Science B.V.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejim.2013.08.005en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to European journal of internal medicineen
dc.subjectLyflækningaren
dc.subjectNámen
dc.subjectNámskráren
dc.subject.meshCurriculumen
dc.subject.meshDiagnosis-Related Groupsen
dc.subject.meshEducation, Medical, Graduateen
dc.subject.meshEuropeen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHealth Care Surveysen
dc.subject.meshHospitalsen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshInternal Medicineen
dc.subject.meshInterneten
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen
dc.titleThe practice of internal medicine in Europe: organisation, clinical conditions and procedures.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentW Suffolk Hosp, Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England, So Gen Hosp, Glasgow G51 4TF, Lanark, Scotland, Western Sussex Hosp, Brighton, E Sussex, England, Carmel Hosp, Haifa, Israel, Univ Hosp Skane, Malmo, Sweden, Lund Univ, Lund, Sweden, Brighton & Sussex Univ Hosp Trust, Brighton, E Sussex, England, Landspitali, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland, Univ Iceland, Reykjavik, Icelanden
dc.identifier.journalEuropean journal of internal medicineen
dc.rights.accessOpen Access - Opinn aðganguren
html.description.abstractCurrent information on the role of internists in the European countries is scarce. This report describes the results of a survey of the practice of internists in Europe.
html.description.abstractTwo online questionnaire-based surveys were carried out by the European Board of Internal Medicine, one on the practice of internists and the other on postgraduate training in internal medicine. The national internal medicine societies of all 30 member countries of the European Federation of Internal Medicine were invited to participate. The responses were reviewed by internal medicine trainees from the respective countries and summaries of the data were sent to the national societies for approval. Descriptive analysis of the data on the practice of internists was carried out.
html.description.abstractTwenty-seven countries (90%) completed the questionnaire and approved their datasets. In 8 European countries, most internists practised internal medicine alone and in 7 countries at least half of physicians practised internal medicine together with a subspecialty. Internal medicine was considered a hospital-based specialty in most countries. The majority of selected presenting problems and diagnoses were rated as commonly encountered in all countries. More variability between countries was observed in the performance of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures.
html.description.abstractMany similarities exist in the practice of internal medicine between the European countries, while some differences are present that likely reflect the variable impact of subspecialisation. The results of the survey should prove valuable for the definition of specific competencies and development of a common curriculum for internal medicine at the European level.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Publisher version

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record