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dc.contributor.authorKristensen, S L
dc.contributor.authorRamlau-Hansen, C H
dc.contributor.authorErnst, E
dc.contributor.authorOlsen, S F
dc.contributor.authorBonde, J P
dc.contributor.authorVested, A
dc.contributor.authorHalldorsson, T I
dc.contributor.authorBecher, G
dc.contributor.authorHaug, L S
dc.contributor.authorToft, G
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-18T10:15:27Z
dc.date.available2014-08-18T10:15:27Z
dc.date.issued2013-12
dc.date.submitted2013
dc.identifier.citationHum. Reprod. 2013, 28 (12):3337-48en
dc.identifier.issn1460-2350
dc.identifier.pmid24129614
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/humrep/det382
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/324901
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink at the bottom of the pageen
dc.description.abstractDoes prenatal exposure to perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) have long-term effects on female reproductive function?.
dc.description.abstractOur results suggest an association between in utero exposure to perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and delay in age of menarche.
dc.description.abstractPrevious cross-sectional studies have reported possible effects of PFASs on female reproduction including reduced fecundity, delayed puberty and accelerated age at menopause. Only limited data exist from follow-up studies on long-term implications of prenatal exposure to PFASs.
dc.description.abstractIn this study we used data from a Danish population-based cohort established in 1988-1989. Of 1212 eligible pregnant women, 965 participated. Follow-up was initiated in 2008 on the female offspring at ∼20 years of age. Three hundred and sixty seven (84%) daughters answered a questionnaire and 267 (61%) daughters furthermore attended clinical examinations which were conducted in 2008-2009.
dc.description.abstractThe final study population consisted of 343 daughters of which 254 had attended the clinical examinations and 89 had answered the questionnaire only. Levels of PFASs in maternal serum from pregnancy week 30 were used as a measure of prenatal exposure and related to age of menarche, menstrual cycle length, levels of reproductive hormones and follicle number of the daughters. Data were divided into three groups according to tertiles of maternal concentrations of PFASs (low, medium, high).
dc.description.abstractIn adjusted regression analyses, daughters exposed to higher levels of PFOA in utero had a 5.3 (95% confidence interval: 1.3; 9.3) months later age of menarche compared with the reference group of lower PFOA. Crude (P = 0.05) and adjusted (P = 0.01) trend tests also indicated a relationship between higher prenatal PFOA exposure and delay of menarche.
dc.description.abstractWe did not measure the exact amount of PFASs to which the daughters had been exposed prenatally. Instead we used PFAS concentrations in maternal serum as surrogates. However, PFASs are efficiently transferred to the fetus via placenta. Information on age of menarche was collected retrospectively but the time interval for recall in our study was relatively short (2-10 years). The remaining outcome measures depended on participation in clinical examination which reduced the number of observations leading to limited statistical power and risk of selection bias.
dc.description.abstractSince PFASs can be detected in humans all over the world, effects of prenatal exposure on female reproductive function later in life may have wide health implications.
dc.description.abstractThe study was supported by the Danish Council for Independent Research (271-05-0296, 09-065631), the Danish Ministry of Interior and Health (0-302-02-18/5), the Danish Council for Strategic Research (09-067124 (Centre for Fetal Programming), 09-063072, 2101-06-0005), the Novo Nordisk Foundation, the Aarhus University Research Foundation, the Frimodt-Heineke Foundation, the Foundation of Maria Dorthea and Holger From, the Beckett-Foundation, the Research Grant of Organon and the Foundation of Lily Benthine Lund. There are no competing interests.
dc.description.abstractNot applicable.
dc.description.sponsorshipDanish Council for Independent Research 271-05-0296 09-065631 Danish Ministry of Interior and Health 0-302-02-18/5 Danish Council for Strategic Research (Centre for Fetal Programming) 09-067124 Danish Council for Strategic Research 09-063072 2101-06-0005 Novo Nordisk Foundation Aarhus University Research Foundation Frimodt-Heineke Foundation Foundation of Maria Dorthea and Holger From Beckett-Foundation Research Grant of Organon Foundation of Lily Benthine Lunden
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford Univ Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1093/humrep/det382en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Human reproduction (Oxford, England)en
dc.subjectÆxlunen
dc.subjectMeðgangaen
dc.subjectTíðir kvennaen
dc.subjectUmhverfisáhrifen
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshCaprylatesen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshFluorocarbonsen
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMenarcheen
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen
dc.subject.meshPrenatal Exposure Delayed Effectsen
dc.subject.meshReproductionen
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten
dc.titleLong-term effects of prenatal exposure to perfluoroalkyl substances on female reproduction.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentAarhus Univ Hosp, Dept Occupat Med, Danish Ramazzini Ctr, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark, Aarhus Univ, Dept Publ Hlth, Epidemiol Sect, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark, Aarhus Univ Hosp, Dept Gynecol & Obstet, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark, Aarhus Univ, Inst Anat, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark, Statens Serum Inst, Ctr Fetal Programming, DK-2300 Copenhagen S, Denmark, Univ Copenhagen, Bispebjerg Hosp, Dept Occupat & Environm Med, DK-2300 Copenhagen S, Denmark, Univ Iceland, Fac Food Sci & Nutr, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland, Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Div Environm Med, NO-0403 Oslo, Norwayen
dc.identifier.journalHuman reproduction (Oxford, England)en
dc.rights.accessClosed - Lokaðen
html.description.abstractDoes prenatal exposure to perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) have long-term effects on female reproductive function?.
html.description.abstractOur results suggest an association between in utero exposure to perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and delay in age of menarche.
html.description.abstractPrevious cross-sectional studies have reported possible effects of PFASs on female reproduction including reduced fecundity, delayed puberty and accelerated age at menopause. Only limited data exist from follow-up studies on long-term implications of prenatal exposure to PFASs.
html.description.abstractIn this study we used data from a Danish population-based cohort established in 1988-1989. Of 1212 eligible pregnant women, 965 participated. Follow-up was initiated in 2008 on the female offspring at ∼20 years of age. Three hundred and sixty seven (84%) daughters answered a questionnaire and 267 (61%) daughters furthermore attended clinical examinations which were conducted in 2008-2009.
html.description.abstractThe final study population consisted of 343 daughters of which 254 had attended the clinical examinations and 89 had answered the questionnaire only. Levels of PFASs in maternal serum from pregnancy week 30 were used as a measure of prenatal exposure and related to age of menarche, menstrual cycle length, levels of reproductive hormones and follicle number of the daughters. Data were divided into three groups according to tertiles of maternal concentrations of PFASs (low, medium, high).
html.description.abstractIn adjusted regression analyses, daughters exposed to higher levels of PFOA in utero had a 5.3 (95% confidence interval: 1.3; 9.3) months later age of menarche compared with the reference group of lower PFOA. Crude (P = 0.05) and adjusted (P = 0.01) trend tests also indicated a relationship between higher prenatal PFOA exposure and delay of menarche.
html.description.abstractWe did not measure the exact amount of PFASs to which the daughters had been exposed prenatally. Instead we used PFAS concentrations in maternal serum as surrogates. However, PFASs are efficiently transferred to the fetus via placenta. Information on age of menarche was collected retrospectively but the time interval for recall in our study was relatively short (2-10 years). The remaining outcome measures depended on participation in clinical examination which reduced the number of observations leading to limited statistical power and risk of selection bias.
html.description.abstractSince PFASs can be detected in humans all over the world, effects of prenatal exposure on female reproductive function later in life may have wide health implications.
html.description.abstractThe study was supported by the Danish Council for Independent Research (271-05-0296, 09-065631), the Danish Ministry of Interior and Health (0-302-02-18/5), the Danish Council for Strategic Research (09-067124 (Centre for Fetal Programming), 09-063072, 2101-06-0005), the Novo Nordisk Foundation, the Aarhus University Research Foundation, the Frimodt-Heineke Foundation, the Foundation of Maria Dorthea and Holger From, the Beckett-Foundation, the Research Grant of Organon and the Foundation of Lily Benthine Lund. There are no competing interests.
html.description.abstractNot applicable.


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