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dc.contributor.authorPetersen, Sesilje B
dc.contributor.authorRasmussen, Morten A
dc.contributor.authorStrøm, Marin
dc.contributor.authorHalldorsson, Thorhallur I
dc.contributor.authorOlsen, Sjurdur F
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-18T09:32:34Z
dc.date.available2014-08-18T09:32:34Z
dc.date.issued2013-10
dc.date.submitted2013
dc.identifier.citationPublic Health Nutr. 2013, 16 (10):1810-9en
dc.identifier.issn1475-2727
dc.identifier.pmid22971358
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S1368980012004119
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/324913
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink at the bottom of the pageen
dc.description.abstractTo develop a basis for building models that can examine the impact of organic food (OF) choices on maternal and offspring health, including identification of factors associated with OF consumption and underlying dietary patterns.
dc.description.abstractDietary intake was collected for the preceding month from an FFQ in mid-pregnancy and information on sociodemographic characteristics was collected from telephone interviews during pregnancy. From a question about OF consumption in the FFQ, including six food categories, an OF preference index was calculated. Latent variables that captured the variability in OF choices in relation to dietary intake were defined.
dc.description.abstractThe Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC), 1996-2002.
dc.description.abstractPregnant women from DNBC (n 60,773).
dc.description.abstractWe found that frequent OF use was highly associated with age, occupational status, urbanization, smoking and vegetarianism. By principal components analysis we identified two eating patterns, a ‘Western dietary pattern’ and a ‘Prudent dietary pattern’, that explained 14.2% of the variability in data. Frequent OF users consumed a more ‘prudent’ diet compared with non-users and had significantly higher intakes of vegetables (167%), fibre (113%) and n-3 fatty acids (111%) and less saturated fat (28%).
dc.description.abstractFrequent OF users seemed to have a healthier lifestyle than non-users. These findings highlight a major challenge in observational studies examining the impact of OF consumption on health due to potentially irremediable confounding factors.
dc.description.sponsorshipDanish Fund for Organic Agriculture European Union Integrated Research Project EARNEST/FOOD-CT-2005-007036 Danish Council for Strategic Research 09-067124 March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation Danish Heart Association Danish Medical Research Council Sygekassernes Helsefond Danish National Research Foundation Danish Pharmaceutical Association Ministry of Health National Board of Health Statens Serum Instituten
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCambridge Univ Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1368980012004119en
dc.relation.urlhttp://journals.cambridge.org/download.php?file=%2FPHN%2FPHN16_10%2FS1368980012004119a.pdf&code=7e6ea3e9c7b3c7f91339879b90c07d0cen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Public health nutritionen
dc.subjectMataræðien
dc.subjectÁvextiren
dc.subjectGrænmetien
dc.subjectHollusta mataren
dc.subjectFituefnien
dc.subjectPrótínen
dc.subjectMeðgangaen
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshChoice Behavioren
dc.subject.meshDenmarken
dc.subject.meshDieten
dc.subject.meshDietary Fatsen
dc.subject.meshDietary Fiberen
dc.subject.meshDietary Proteinsen
dc.subject.meshFatty Acids, Omega-3en
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshFood Habitsen
dc.subject.meshFood Preferencesen
dc.subject.meshFood, Organicen
dc.subject.meshFruiten
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshLife Styleen
dc.subject.meshLogistic Modelsen
dc.subject.meshMicronutrientsen
dc.subject.meshMultivariate Analysisen
dc.subject.meshNutrition Assessmenten
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen
dc.subject.meshPregnant Womenen
dc.subject.meshPrincipal Component Analysisen
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen
dc.subject.meshSocioeconomic Factorsen
dc.subject.meshVegetablesen
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten
dc.titleSociodemographic characteristics and food habits of organic consumers--a study from the Danish National Birth Cohort.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentStatens Serum Inst, Dept Epidemiol Res, Ctr Fetal Programming, DK-2300 Copenhagen S, Denmark, Fac Life Sci, Dept Food Sci Qual & Technol, Copenhagen, Denmark, Univ Iceland, Sch Hlth Sci, Unit Nutr Res, Fac Food Sci & Nutr, Reykjavik, Iceland, Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Nutr, Boston, MA 02115 USAen
dc.identifier.journalPublic health nutritionen
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren
html.description.abstractTo develop a basis for building models that can examine the impact of organic food (OF) choices on maternal and offspring health, including identification of factors associated with OF consumption and underlying dietary patterns.
html.description.abstractDietary intake was collected for the preceding month from an FFQ in mid-pregnancy and information on sociodemographic characteristics was collected from telephone interviews during pregnancy. From a question about OF consumption in the FFQ, including six food categories, an OF preference index was calculated. Latent variables that captured the variability in OF choices in relation to dietary intake were defined.
html.description.abstractThe Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC), 1996-2002.
html.description.abstractPregnant women from DNBC (n 60,773).
html.description.abstractWe found that frequent OF use was highly associated with age, occupational status, urbanization, smoking and vegetarianism. By principal components analysis we identified two eating patterns, a ‘Western dietary pattern’ and a ‘Prudent dietary pattern’, that explained 14.2% of the variability in data. Frequent OF users consumed a more ‘prudent’ diet compared with non-users and had significantly higher intakes of vegetables (167%), fibre (113%) and n-3 fatty acids (111%) and less saturated fat (28%).
html.description.abstractFrequent OF users seemed to have a healthier lifestyle than non-users. These findings highlight a major challenge in observational studies examining the impact of OF consumption on health due to potentially irremediable confounding factors.


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