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dc.contributor.authorBjörnsdóttir, Erla
dc.contributor.authorJanson, Christer
dc.contributor.authorSigurdsson, Jón F
dc.contributor.authorGehrman, Philip
dc.contributor.authorPerlis, Michael
dc.contributor.authorJuliusson, Sigurdur
dc.contributor.authorArnardottir, Erna S
dc.contributor.authorKuna, Samuel T
dc.contributor.authorPack, Allan I
dc.contributor.authorGislason, Thorarinn
dc.contributor.authorBenediktsdóttir, Bryndis
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-19T13:02:23Z
dc.date.available2014-08-19T13:02:23Z
dc.date.issued2013-12
dc.date.submitted2013
dc.identifier.citationSleep 2013, 36 (12):1901-9en
dc.identifier.issn1550-9109
dc.identifier.pmid24293765
dc.identifier.doi10.5665/sleep.3226
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/324987
dc.description.abstractTo assess the changes of insomnia symptoms among patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) from starting treatment with positive airway pressure (PAP) to a 2-y follow-up.
dc.description.abstractLongitudinal cohort study.
dc.description.abstractLandspitali--The National University Hospital of Iceland.
dc.description.abstractThere were 705 adults with OSA who were assessed prior to and 2 y after starting PAP treatment.
dc.description.abstractPAP treatment for OSA.
dc.description.abstractAll patients underwent a medical examination along with a type 3 sleep study and answered questionnaires on health and sleep before and 2 y after starting PAP treatment. The change in prevalence of insomnia symptoms by subtype was assessed by questionnaire and compared between individuals who were using or not using PAP at follow-up. Symptoms of middle insomnia were most common at baseline and improved significantly among patients using PAP (from 59.4% to 30.7%, P < 0.001). Symptoms of initial insomnia tended to persist regardless of PAP treatment, and symptoms of late insomnia were more likely to improve among patients not using PAP. Patients with symptoms of initial and late insomnia at baseline were less likely to adhere to PAP (odds ratio [OR] 0.56, P = 0.007, and OR 0.53, P < 0.001, respectively).
dc.description.abstractPositive airway pressure treatment significantly reduced symptoms of middle insomnia. Symptoms of initial and late insomnia, however, tended to persist regardless of positive airway pressure treatment and had a negative effect on adherence. Targeted treatment for insomnia may be beneficial for patients with obstructive sleep apnea comorbid with insomnia and has the potential to positively affect adherence to positive airway pressure.
dc.description.sponsorshipNIH HL72067 HL94307 Eimskip Fund of the University of Iceland Landspitali University Hospital Research Fund Philips Respironicsen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmer Acad Sleep Medicineen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.5665/sleep.3226en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3825440/en
dc.relation.urlfile:///C:/Users/solveig/Downloads/Article.pdfen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Sleepen
dc.subjectSvefnleysien
dc.subjectKæfisvefnen
dc.subject.meshSleep Apnea Syndromesen
dc.subject.meshSleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology*en
dc.titleSymptoms of insomnia among patients with obstructive sleep apnea before and after two years of positive airway pressure treatment.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland, Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci Resp Med & Allergol, S-75105 Uppsala, Sweden, Landspitali Natl Univ Hosp Iceland, Dept Resp Med & Sleep, Reykjavik, Iceland, Univ Penn, Ctr Sleep & Circadian Neurobiol, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA, Univ Penn, Dept Med, Div Sleep Med, Perelman Sch Med, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA, Univ Penn, Sch Med, Dept Psychiat, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA, Landspitali Natl Univ Hosp Iceland, Mental Hlth Serv, Reykjavik, Iceland, Landspitali Natl Univ Hosp Iceland, Dept Otolaryngol, Reykjavik, Iceland, Philadelphia Vet Affairs Med Ctr, Philadelphia, PA USAen
dc.identifier.journalSleepen
dc.rights.accessClosed - Lokaðen
html.description.abstractTo assess the changes of insomnia symptoms among patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) from starting treatment with positive airway pressure (PAP) to a 2-y follow-up.
html.description.abstractLongitudinal cohort study.
html.description.abstractLandspitali--The National University Hospital of Iceland.
html.description.abstractThere were 705 adults with OSA who were assessed prior to and 2 y after starting PAP treatment.
html.description.abstractPAP treatment for OSA.
html.description.abstractAll patients underwent a medical examination along with a type 3 sleep study and answered questionnaires on health and sleep before and 2 y after starting PAP treatment. The change in prevalence of insomnia symptoms by subtype was assessed by questionnaire and compared between individuals who were using or not using PAP at follow-up. Symptoms of middle insomnia were most common at baseline and improved significantly among patients using PAP (from 59.4% to 30.7%, P < 0.001). Symptoms of initial insomnia tended to persist regardless of PAP treatment, and symptoms of late insomnia were more likely to improve among patients not using PAP. Patients with symptoms of initial and late insomnia at baseline were less likely to adhere to PAP (odds ratio [OR] 0.56, P = 0.007, and OR 0.53, P < 0.001, respectively).
html.description.abstractPositive airway pressure treatment significantly reduced symptoms of middle insomnia. Symptoms of initial and late insomnia, however, tended to persist regardless of positive airway pressure treatment and had a negative effect on adherence. Targeted treatment for insomnia may be beneficial for patients with obstructive sleep apnea comorbid with insomnia and has the potential to positively affect adherence to positive airway pressure.


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